The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
-vir, -viro (Suffix) "man"
A cranberry morpheme from Latin vir "man." From Proto-Italic *wiro- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *u̯i̯H-ró- "man," "warrior." The root *u̯i̯H- connotated virility and power.
Indo-European
Italic
Umbrian uiro "company of men"
Celtic
Gaulish uiro-, Celtiberian uiros, Old Irish fer, Old Welsh gur, Old Breton -gur, Old Cornish gur
Germanic
Gothic wair, Old Norse verr, Old High German wer, Old Saxon wer, Old English wer (English were, found in werewolf)
Balto-Slavic
Lithuanian výras, Old Prussian wijrs
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit vīrá- "man," "hero," Avestan vīra-
Tocharian
A wir "youthful"
visión f. (Noun) "vision"
13th cent. From Latin visionem, accusative of visio 'id.' From videre "to see" (see ver).
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese visão, French vision, Italian visione
visita f. (Noun) "visit"
From visitar.
visitar (Verb) "to visit"
From Latin visitare 'id.' From visere "to see" and frequentive suffix -tare (see note under faltar). From Proto-Italic *weid-s- "to foresee," a desiderative from *wid-ē- "to see" (see ver).
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese visitar, Catalan visitar, French visiter, Italian visitare, Romanian vizita
vistazo m. (Noun) "glance"
From vista and -azo, a suffix indicating brevity.
vivir (Verb) "to live"
10th cent. From Latin vivere 'id.' From Proto-Italic *gwīw-e/o- "to live." From Proto-Indo-European *gwi̯H-u̯-e/o- 'id.' From the root *gwei̯H- "to live."
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian vivir, Portuguese viver, Galician vivir, Catalan viure, French vivre, Italian vivere, Romanian învia, Sardinian bívere
Balto-Slavic
Old Russian gojъ "peace," Russian živój "live," BCS žȋv "alive," Slovene žív 'id.,' Old Prussian gijwans, geiwans 'id.,' Lithuanian gývas 'id.,' Latvian dzîvs 'id.'
Hellenic
Ancient Greek βίος (bíos) "life"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit jī́vati "to live," Avestan juua- 'id.'
vivo (Adjective) "alive"
10th cent. From Latin vivus 'id.' From Proto-Italic *wīwo- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *gwi̯h3-u̯o- 'id.'
The surname Vivó is a diminutive from Catalan viu "alive," first given as a nickname to persons who were considered fast learners.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian vivu, Portuguese vivo, Galician vivo, Catalan viu, French vif, Italian vivo, Aromanian yiu, Romanian viu, Sardinian bibu
Italic
Oscan bivus "alive," Venetic vivoi 'id.'
Balto-Slavic
Old Russian gojъ "peace," Russian živój "live," BCS žȋv "alive," Slovene žív 'id.,' Old Prussian gijwans, geiwans 'id.,' Lithuanian gývas 'id.,' Latvian dzîvs 'id.'
Hellenic
Ancient Greek βίος (bíos) "life"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit jī́vati "to live," Avestan juua- 'id.'
-VncV, -VngV Suffices forming relational adjectives from nouns.
Suffices include: -anco, -ango, -angue, -enco, -engo, -engue, -enque, -ingo, -ingue, -onco, -ongo, -unco, -ungo.

Taken from Gothic *-ingôs, a noun-forming suffix meaning "descending from," of which use in West Germanic languages is frequent, but there is limited attestation of the suffix in Gothic. From Proto-Germanic -inga-, a suffix forming gerund nouns from verbs.
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese -ango, -engo, Galician -ango, -engo, French -ange, -ans, -ine, -ingues, Italian -engo
Germanic
Old Norse -ingr, Old High German -ing, Old Dutch -ing, Old Saxon -ing, Old English -ing (English -ing)
"Although the ultimate Germanic origin of -engo so used is generally accepted, the functional shift involved still remain unclear as none of the Germanic forms in -ing seem to have survived in Spanish. I would not dismiss the suggestion the possibility that the suffix represents the local adaptation of [Catalan and Occitan] -enc." ~ S. Dworkin, A History of the Spanish Lexicon (2012) (citations omitted)
volar (Verb) "to fly;" "to blow up"
13th cent. From Latin volare "to fly." From Proto-Italic *gwela-je/o- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *gwelh1-i̯e/o- "to raise an arm."
Indo-European
Romance
Catalan voler, French vouloir, volition, Italian volere, Aromanian voi, Romanian vrea, Sardinian bòliri
Celtic
Old Irish a-t-baill "to die"
Hellenic
Ancient Greek βάλλειν (bállein) "to hit by throwing"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit gari "to raise an arm (in order to strike)"
voluntad f. (Noun) "will"
10th cent. From Latin voluntatem, accusative of voluntas 'id.' From velle "to desire." From Proto-Italic *wel-e/o- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *u̯elh1- "to pursue."
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese vontade, Catalan voluntat, French volonté, Italian voluntà, Sardinian bolontade
Germanic
Gothic waljan "to choose," Old Norse velja "to choose," Old High German wellan "choice," Old Saxon wellian 'id.,' English to will
Balto-Slavic
Old Church Slavonic velěti "to want," Russian velét' 'id.,' Czech veleti "to command," Slovene velẹ́ti "to want," Lithuanian vélti "to allow"
Hellenic
Ancient Greek λῆμα (lêma) "will"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit vr̥ṇīté "he chooses," Old Avestan var- "to choose"