The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
verter (Verb) "to spill," "to empty (a liquid)"
10th cent. From Latin vertere "to turn." From Proto-Italic *wert- 'id.,' from Proto-Indo-European *u̯ert- 'id.'
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese verter, Italian vertere
Italic
Oscan ϝερσορει (wersosei), epithet of Jupiter (lit. "one who turns"), Umbrian vurtus "he turned"
Germanic
Gothic wairþan "to become," Old Norse verða 'id.,' Old High German werdan 'id.,' Old Saxon werthan 'id.,' Old English weorðan 'id.'
Balto-Slavic
Serbian Chuch Slavic vrьtěti "to turn," Russian vertét' 'id.,' Czech vrtěti 'id.,' Polish wiercić 'id.,' Slovene vrtẹ́ti 'id.,' Old Prussian wīrst "to become," Lithuanian vir̃sti "to turn"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit vártate "to turn around," Young Avestan varəta- 'id.'
Tocharian
A wärt- "to throw"
vestido (Adjective, Noun) "dressed;" "dress," "suit"
11th cent. An adjectival from vestir.
vestigio m. (Noun) "vestige"
15th cent. From Latin vestigium "track." A metaphor of the footprints one leaves behind. Of unknown origin. However, de Vaan (2014) connects it to Proto-Italic *wers- "to sweep" (see barrer).
Indo-European
Romance
French vestige, Romanian vestigiu
vestir (Verb) "to dress"
11th cent. From Latin vestire 'id.' From vestis "garment." From Proto-Italic *wes-ti- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *u̯es-ti̯- 'id.' From a root *u̯es- "to clothe."
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian vestir, Portuguese vestir, Galician vestir, Catalan vestir, French vêtir, Italian vestire, Sardinian bestire
Germanic
Gothic wasjan "to dress," Old High German werian 'id.,' Old English werian 'id.' (English to wear)
Albanian
Albanian vesh "to clothe"
Hellenic
Ancient Greek εἵματα (eímata) "clothes"
Armenian
Armenian z-genowm "to clothe oneself"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit váste "to wear," Old Avestan vastra- "garment"
Tocharian
A wäs- "to wear," B wäs- 'id.'
vez f. (Noun) "time"
10th cent. From Latin vicis "turn," "occaision." Perhaps from an unattested Vulgar Latin form *vix. From Proto-Italic *wik- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *u̯ik- 'id.'
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian vez, Portuguese vez, Galician vez, Catalan vegada, French fois, Italian vece
Celtic
Old Irish fichid "to battle," Middle Welsh gweith "battle," Old Breton gueth 'id.'
Germanic
Gothic weihan "to fight," Old Norse vega 'id.,' Old High German wīgan 'id.,' Old English wīgan 'id.'
Balto-Slavic
Lithuanian veĩkti "to work," Latvian vīkstu "to work"
Hellenic
Ancient Greek εἴκω (eíko) "I am like"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit viviktás "both embrace," Middle Persian winj̆- "to contain"
vía f. (Noun) "road," "way"
12th cent. From Latin via 'id.' From Proto-Italic *wijā- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *u̯ih1-eh2- "pursuit," from the root verb *u̯ei̯h1- "to pursue."
Not the direct origin of the surname Via, which in reality comes from the cognate in Italian via.
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese via, Galician vía, Catalan via, French voie, Italian via, Romanian via
Italic
Oscan víú "road," Umbrian via 'id.,' South Picene víam 'id.'
Balto-Slavic
Old Church Slavonic povinǫti "to subject," Lithuanian výti "to drive"
Hellenic
Ancient Greek ἵεσθαι (ísthai) "to strive"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit viyánti "they pursue," Young Avestan viia- "to pursue"
viajar (Verb) "to travel"
18th cent. From viaje.
viaje m. (Noun) "trip," "travel"
14th cent. Borrowed from Catalan viatje 'id.' From Latin viaticum "journey," a noun formed from the adjective viaticus "travelled." From via "road" (see vía) and -aticus, an adjective-forming suffix (see -azgo).
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese viagem, Catalan viatge, French voyage, Italian viaggio
víctima f. (Noun) "victim"
Late 15th cent. From Latin victima "sacrificial animal." From Proto-Italic *wik-tm-ā- 'id.' From late Proto-Indo-European *u̯ik-tm-eh2 "consecrated animal for sacrifice." From a root *u̯ei̯k- "to be holy" that may have been borrowed from an outside souce or internally innovated.

A connection to the Proto-Indo-European root *u̯ei̯k- "to select" looks semantically unmotivated: "[The reflex of the verb *u̯ei̯k- "to select" in Indo-Iranian] has no particular religious significance and it is highly unlikely that only [Indo-Iranian] would have retained the presumably older (more profane) meaning of 'to separate (from the rest), single out, etc.'" (Cheung 2014).

Abandoning *u̯ei̯k- "to select" and returning to the late Indo-European root *u̯ei̯k- "to be holy," Germanic languages point to both *u̯ei̯gh- and *u̯ei̯k- in Proto-Indo-European. Variation in the root's final consonant may be considered further evidence of borrowing from a language with a different sound.
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese vítima, Catalan víctima, French victime, Italian vittima, Romanian victimă
Italic
Umbrian eveietu? "let him consecrate" (this points to *u̯ei̯g-, a variation that is problematic if the word is native to Proto-Indo-European and not borrowed from an outside source)
Germanic
Gothic weihs "holy," Old High German wīh 'id.'
victoria f. (Noun) "victory"
13th cent. From Latin victoria 'id.' From vincere "to conquer" (see vencer).
The origin of the surname Victoria and the toponym Vitoria, a town in Álava.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian victoria, Portuguese vitória, Galician victoria, Catalan victòria, French victoire, Italian vittoria, Romanian victorie