The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
vigilia f. (Noun) "vigil"
12th cent. From Latin vigilia "watch," "wakefulness," from vigil "alert," "awake." From Proto-Italic *weg-li- "strong," "active," "alert;" with the *-e- undergoing i-mutation. From Proto-Indo-European *u̯eǵ-l-i̯- "strong," "lively," from the root *u̯eǵ- "to be strong," "to be awake."
Also the origin of the surname Vigilia. Vigil, name of a town in Oviedo, is from Latin vigil.
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese vigília, Catalan vigília, French veille, Italian veglia
Germanic
Gothic wakan "wake," Old Norse vakinn "woke," Old English wacan "wake" (English wake)
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit vā́ja- "contest"
villa f. (Noun) "village"
12th cent. From Latin villa "country house." From Proto-Italic *weik-slā- "farm." From Proto-Indo-European *u̯ei̯k- "to settle."
Indo-European
Germanic
Gothic weihs "village"
Albanian
Albanian zonjë "lady"
Balto-Slavic
Russian vesʹ "village," BCS vas 'id.,' Czech ves 'id.,' Latvian vìesis "guest," Lithuanian viēšpati "mistress," Old Prussian waispattin "mistress of a house"
Hellenic
Ancient Greek ϝοῖκος (woîkos) "household," Mycenaean wo-i-ko-de "house"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit veśa- "to sit down," Avestan vīsa- "to get ready"
Tocharian
A wikpots "clan master"
villano "lowly," "rude;" "peasant"
11th cent. From Vulgar Latin *villanus, originally "one who lives in a country house," and later "person from the countryside." From Latin villa "country house" (see villa).
vino m. (Noun) "wine"
11th cent. From Latin vinum 'id.' From Proto-Italic *wīno- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *u̯ih1-n- 'id.' Perhaps from the root *u̯eih1- "to weave," in reference to the wrapping growth of the vines.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian vinu, Portuguese vinho, Galician viño, Catalan vi, French vin, Italian vino, Aromanian yin, yinu, Romanian vin, Sardinian binu
Italic
Umbrian vinu "wine," Faliscan uinom 'id.,' Volscian uinu 'id.'
Albanian
Albanian verë "wine"
Hellenic
Ancient Greek οἶνος (oínos) "wine," (dialects) ϝοῖνος (woînos) 'id.'
Armenian
Armenian gini "wine"
"Viticulture is at least as old as the sixth millenium BC in the Caucasus, and the word for 'wine' is the same in the IE family ..., Semitic ..., and the Kartvelian languages of the Caucasus.... Though some believe the word is native PIE, the arguments are speculative, and most researchers believe the word diffused into the IE languages at a post-PIE date." ~ B. Fortson, Indo-European Language and Culture (2011)
virus m. (Noun) "virus"
19th cent. From Latin virus "poison." Dissimilated from Proto-Italic *weis-o- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *u̯ei̯s 'id.,' a root noun.
Indo-European
Celtic
Gaulish visu- "clover," Old Irish "poison," meaning unclear
Hellenic
Ancient Greek ἰ̄ός (iós) "poison"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit viṣá- "venom," Young Avestan vīša- 'id.'
Tocharian
A wäs "poison," B wase 'id.'
-vir, -viro (Suffix) "man"
A cranberry morpheme from Latin vir "man." From Proto-Italic *wiro- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *u̯i̯H-ró- "man," "warrior." The root *u̯i̯H- connotated virility and power.
Indo-European
Italic
Umbrian uiro "company of men"
Celtic
Gaulish uiro-, Celtiberian uiros, Old Irish fer, Old Welsh gur, Old Breton -gur, Old Cornish gur
Germanic
Gothic wair, Old Norse verr, Old High German wer, Old Saxon wer, Old English wer (English were, found in werewolf)
Balto-Slavic
Lithuanian výras, Old Prussian wijrs
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit vīrá- "man," "hero," Avestan vīra-
Tocharian
A wir "youthful"
visión f. (Noun) "vision"
13th cent. From Latin visionem, accusative of visio 'id.' From videre "to see" (see ver).
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese visão, French vision, Italian visione
visita f. (Noun) "visit"
From visitar.
visitar (Verb) "to visit"
From Latin visitare 'id.' From visere "to see" and frequentive suffix -tare (see note under faltar). From Proto-Italic *weid-s- "to foresee," a desiderative from *wid-ē- "to see" (see ver).
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese visitar, Catalan visitar, French visiter, Italian visitare, Romanian vizita
vistazo m. (Noun) "glance"
From vista and -azo, a suffix indicating brevity.