The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
vacación f. (Noun) "vacation"
Very late 15th cent. From Latin vacationem, accusative of vacatio 'id.' From vacare "to be free from duties," "to be empty" (see vacar).
vacar (Verb) "to temporarily cease one's business or studies;" "to be empty"
From Latin vacare "to be free from duties;" "to be empty." Originally an adjective in Proto-Italic *wako- "empty." From Proto-Indo-European *h1u̯h2-ko- 'id.'
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese vagar, vacar, French vaquer, Italian vacare
Italic
Latin vastus "empty"
Celtic
Old Irish fás "empty"
Germanic
Old High German wuosti "empty," Old Saxon wōsti 'id.,' Old English wōsti 'id.' (English waste)
vadear (Verb) "to wade"
Late 15th cent. From Latin vadum "ford," and not directly from vadere "to wade." See vado.
vado m. (Noun) "ford"
10th cent. From Latin vadum "ford." From Proto-Italic *waþo- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *u̯h2dh-o- 'id.'
Also the origin of numerous surnames including Vado, Vados, Bado, Bados, Vadillo, Vadillos, Badillo, Vadal, Vade, Vahillo, Badi, Vaillo, Vaello, Baelo, Badino, Badilla, and Badosa.
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese vau, French gué, Italian guado, Romanian vad, Sardinian badu
Celtic
Welsh go-di-wawd "overtook"
Germanic
Old Norse vað "to wade," Old High German watan 'id.,' Old English wadan 'id.' (English to wade)
valer (Verb) "to help;" "to value," "to be worth"
Very late 11th cent. From Latin valere "to be well," "to be strong" From Proto-Italic *wal-ē- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *h2u̯lh1-eh1- "to be strong." Perhaps the root *h2u̯lh1- meant "to be big," "to be great."
Also the origin of the toponym Valer, name of a town in Zamora, as well as Valero and Valeros, two towns located in Salamanca.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian valer, Portuguese valer, Galician valer, Catalan valer, French valoir, Italian valere, Sardinian balere
Italic
Oscan ϝαλε (wale) "farewell," Marrucinian uali 'id.,' Paelignian ual 'id.,' South Picene velaimes "of the best"
Celtic
Old Irish fallnaithir "to rule"
Germanic
Gothic waldan "to rule," Old Norse valda 'id.,' Old High German walten 'id.,' Old English wealdan "to wield power" (English to wield),
Balto-Slavic
Chuch Slavic vladěti "to rule," Russian vladét' "to own," Polish wɫadać "to rule," Slovene vládati 'id.,' Old Prussian weldīsnan "inheritance," Lithuanian veldė́ti "to inherit," Latvian vàldît "to rule"
Tocharian
A wäl "king," B walo 'id.'
válido (Adjective) "valid"
17th cent. From Latin validus "valid," but originally "strong," "healthy;" from the verb valere "to be healthy" (see valer).
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian válidu, Portuguese válido, Catalan vàlid, French valide, Italian valido, Romanian valid
valido (Noun, Adjective) "favorite"
17th cent. From the past participle of valer.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian valer, Portuguese valer, Galician valer, Catalan valer, French valoir, Italian valere, Sardinian balere, baliri, valere
valiente (Adjective, Noun) "valient;" "valient person"
10th cent. meaning of "worthy;" the modern sense of valor is from the 12th cent. An adjectival from Latin valentem, accusative of valens 'id.' From valere "to be strong" (see valer).
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese valete, Catalan valent, French vaillant, Italian valente
valor m. (Noun) "value;" "courage"
12th cent. From Latin valorem, accusative of valor "value." From valere "to be strong" (see valer).
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian valor, Portuguese valor, Galician valor, Catalan valor, French valeur, Italian valore, Romania valoare, Sardinian balore
vario (Adjective) "various"
15th cent. From Latin varius 'id.' Of unknown origin.
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese vário, Galician veiro, French vair, Italian vaio, Romanian vare
Italic
Latin vafer? "clever" (a connection is formally possible)