The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
termino m. (Noun) "end," "ending"
13th cent. From Latin terminus 'id.' From Proto-Italic *termn-o- "boundary post," an ablauting n-stem from *ter-mn- "boundary stone." From Proto-Indo-European *ter-mn- "peg." The exact meaning of the root *ter- is unclear, possibly meaning "to drill."
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese término,, French terme, Italian termine, Romanian țărm
Italic
Oscan teremenniú "boundary stone," Umbrian termnas "he delimits," Venetic termonios "the boundary," Pre-Samnite τερμανι (termani) "on the boundary"
Hellenic
Ancient Greek τέρμα (térma) "goal"
-terra Suffix "earth"
Borrowed from Latin terra 'id.' (see tierra).
terrible (Adjective) "terrible"
Very early 15th cent. From Latin terribilis 'id.,' from terrere "to frighten." Probably from an earlier, unrecorded Latin form *terseje- 'id.,' before -rs- became -rr- (however, -rs- is preserved in the name of Tursa, goddess of terror). From Proto-Italic *tros-eje- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *tros-ei̯e- 'id.'
Indo-European
Romance
Italian terribile
Italic
Umbrian tusetutu "he scared," turse "to Tursa"
Balto-Slavic
Lithuanian trišė́ti "to tremble"
Hellenic
Ancient Greek τρεῖν (treîn) "to tremble"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit trásanti "he trembles," Young Avestan θrā̊ŋhaiia- "to scare"
tesoro m. (Noun) "treasure"
From Latin thesaurus 'id.,' borrowed from Ancient Greek θησαυρός (thesaurós) "treasure," "storehouse." From the verb τῐθέναι (tithenai) "to place." From late Proto-Indo-European *dhí-dheh1- 'id.,' reduplication of the Proto-Indo-European root *dheh1- "to put."
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese tesouro, Catalan tesaurus, French trésor, Italian tesauro, Romanian tezaur
Germanic
Old English dyde (English did)
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit dádhāti "to place"
testigo (Noun) "witness"
12th cent. From Old Spanish testiguar "to testify," having now become atestiguar.
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese testificar, Italian testificare
tibia f. (Noun) "tibia;" "flute"
19th cent. From Latin tibia 'id.' In ancient times, flutes were made of bone. Of uknown origin. Perhaps a loan from the same source as Ancient Greek σίφων (síphon) "siphon," "tube."
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese tibia, Galician tibia, Catalan tíbia, French tibia, Italian tibia, Romanian tibia
tiempo m. (Noun) "time;" "weather"
12th cent. From Latin tempus 'id.' From Proto-Italic *tempos- "stretch." From Proto-Indo-European *temp-os- 'id.,' from the verbal root *temp- "to stretch."
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian tiempu, Portuguese tempo, Galician tempo, Catalan temps, French temps, Italian tempo, Romanian timp, Sardinian tempus
Italic
Latin templum "shrine"
Germanic
Old Norse þǫmb "bow-string"
Balto-Slavic
BCS tetíva "bow-string," Old Prussian tēmpran "expensive," Lithuanian tem̃pti "to pull"
Tocharian
A cämpäṣ "is able," B campäṃ "to be able"
tienda f. (Noun) "store;" "tent"
10th cent. Borrowed from Medieval Latin tenda "tent" (cf. Basque (Old Low Navarrese) tenda "tailor's shop," borrowed from Latin). Originally referring to cloth stretched between stakes. From Latin tendere "to stretch" (see tender).
Basque
Bizkaian tenda "shop," "tent," Gizpuzkoan denda "shop," Old Low Navarrese tenda "tailor's shop"
tierra f. (Noun) "earth;" "dirt;" "land"
10th cent. From Latin terra 'id.' From Proto-Italic *tersa- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *ters-h2- "dry land," from the verbal root *ters- "to dry out."
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian tierra, Portuguese terra, Galician terra, Catalan terra, French terre, Italian terra, Aromanian tsarã, Romanian țară, Sardinian terra
Italic
Oscan teras "of the earth"
Celtic
Old Irish tír "territory," "dry," Old Welsh tir 'id.,' Middle Breton tir 'id.,' Old Cornish tir 'id.'
tío (Noun) (m.) "uncle;" (f.) "aunt"
10th cent. From Late Latin thius 'id.,' borrowed from Ancient Greek θεῖος ‎(theîos) 'id.' Of unknown origin.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian tíu, Portuguese tio, Catalan tio, Italian zio, Sardinian tiu