The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
simple (Adjective) "simple"
11th cent. Old Spanish simple. From Latin simplex 'id.' but literally "having a single fold/layer." The ending -e in Spanish simple is mysterious: simplex should have yielded **símplez (compare the etymology of juez) while Latin simplus would have given **simplo. Because French simple must have come from simplex, it is more likely the Spanish reflects simplex and was deformed under influence from French or Catalan. In support of this theory, there is a 14th cent. attestation of simplez in Old Spanish. From Proto-Italic *sm̥-plo- 'id.' The first element is from a Proto-Indo-European prefix *sm- "one;" the second element is from *pel- "fold" (see llegar).
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese simples, Catalan simple, French simple, Italian semplice, Romanian simplu
simplemente (Adverb) "simply"
From simple and -mente.
sin (Preposition) "without"
10th cent. Old Spanish sen. 12th cent. Old Spanish sin. From Latin sine 'id.' The evolution from sine > sen is expected, but the change back to sin is not. Montgomery (1983) argues that the change from sen to sin is to avoid confusion with en. A pre-form *seni, preserving the locative -i ending, methathesized to sine (Schrijver 1991). From Proto-Italic *sn̥Hi̯ 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *sn̥h1-i, the locative singular of *senh1- "without."
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese sem, Galician sen, Catalan sense, French sans, Italian senza
Celtic
Old Irish sain- "different," Old Welsh han "separation," Old Breton han "except," Cornish o-hanaw "from him"
Germanic
Gothic sundro "apart," Old High German suntar "without"
Hellenic
Ancient Greek ἄνευ (háneu) "without"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit sanutár "aside," Old Avestan hanarə"without"
Tocharian
A sne "without," B snai 'id.'
sino (Conjunction) "rather," "but"
12th cent. Old Spanish sinon. From si and no.
síp (Latin America) (informal) "yes"
From Old Spanish sí pus "yes, thus." For continuing etymologies, see and pu respectively.
siquiera (Adverb) "even"
Old Spanish siquier. From Latin si quæri 'id.,' from si "if" and quærere "to seek" (see si and querer respectively).
sistema m. (Noun) "system"
From Late Latin systema 'id.,' from Ancient Greek σύστημα (systema) "organized group," from συνιστάναι (synistámai) "to place together." From σῠν- (syn-) "together" and ῐ̔στάναι (histámai) "to place" (cognate with Latin stare "to stand;" see estar). Ancient Greek σύν has an older form ξύν (ksyn), Mycenaean ku-su. Of unknown origin.
sitio m. (Noun) "site," "location"
11th cent. Old Spanish sito, the late appearance of -io in place of -o is obscure. Perhaps under influence from sitiar. 12th cent. Old Spanish sitio. Undoubtedly from Latin situs 'id.,' but the exact route the word took is unclear. From sinere "to place," but originally "to be alone." From Proto-Italic *sin-e/o- "to put in place." From Proto-Indo-European *tḱei̯-/*tḱi̯- "to build," assumed by some (de Vaan 2008; cf. Schrijver 2003) to be an i-present athematic verb formed from *teḱ- "to fashion" (see tejer).
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese sítio, French site, Italian sito
Hellenic
Ancient Greek κτίζειν (ktízdein) "to build," Mycenaean ki-ti-je-si "they live"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit kṣéti "he lives," Old Avestan šaēitī 'id.'
situación f. (Noun) "situation"
17th cent. From Latin situationem, accusative of situatio 'id.' From Medieval Latin situare "to place" (see situar).
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese sítio, French site, Italian
situar (Verb) "to place"
15th cent. From Medieval Latin situare 'id.' From Latin situs (see sitio).
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese sítio, French site, Italian