The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
señal f. (Noun) "sign"
10th cent. From Late Latin signale 'id.,' ultimately from signum "mark." From Proto-Italic *sekno- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *sek-no- "cut."
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese sinal, Catalan senyal, French signal, Italian segnale, Romanian semnal
Italic
Oscan σεγονω (segono) "statues"
Basque
Basque zeinu "signal," from Latin signum
señor (Noun) "lord;" (m.) "mister," (f.) "mistress"
11th cent. Old Spanish el señor "lord," la señor "lady." Feminine suffix -a (1) added to la señor due to hypercharacterization of its gender. From Latin senior "elder," but originally "older." From senex "old." From Proto-Italic *sen-ek- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *sen- 'id.'
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese senhor, Catalan senyor, French seigneur, Italian signore, Sardinian sannori
Celtic
Gaulish Seno-gnatos "old birth," Old Irish sen "old," Middle Welsh hen 'id.,' Old Breton hen 'id.'
Germanic
Gothic sineigs "elderly," Balto-Slavic Lithuanian sẽnas "old," Latvian sęns 'id.'
Hellenic
Ancient Greek ἕνος (hénos) "old"
Armenian
Armenian hin "old"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit sána- "old," Avestan hana- 'id.'
señorito (Noun) "young person"
17th cent. From señor "lord" and diminutive -ito.
sentar (Verb) "to seat"
12th cent. From Vulgar Latin sedentare 'id.,' from sedens "seating," from sedere "to sit." Prior to the 12th cent., far more common than sentar was assentar, from Vulgar Latin *adsentare. From Proto-Italic *sizd-e/o- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *si̯-sd-e/o- "to be sitting." Reduplication of *sed- "to sit."
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian sentar, Portuguese sentar, Galician sentar, Catalan seure, French seoir, Italian sedere, Aromanian shed, Romanian ședea, Sardinian sèdere
Italic
Umbrian sistu "he sat down"
Balto-Slavic
Old Church Slavonic sěsti "to sit down," Russian sest' 'id.,' Czech siesti 'id.,' Polish siąść 'id.,' Slovene sẹ́sti 'id.,' Old Prussian sindants "sitting," Lithuanian sė́sti 'id.'
Hellenic
Ancient Greek ἵζειν (hízdein) "to sit down"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit sī́dati "to sit," Avestan hiδa- 'id.'
sentido (Adjective, Noun) "felt;" "sense"
11th cent. Old Spanish sentido. From sentir.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian sentir, Portuguese sentir, Galician sentir, Catalan sentir, French sentir, Italian sentire, Aromanian simtu, Romanian simți, Sardiniansentire
sentir (Verb) "to feel"
12th cent. Old Spanish sentir. From Latin sentire 'id.' From Proto-Italic *senti-je/o- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *sn̥t-i̯e/o- 'id.' From a root *sent- "to feel," "to think."
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian sentir, Portuguese sentir, Galician sentir, Catalan sentir, French sentir, Italian sentire, Aromanian simtu, Romanian simți, Sardiniansentire
Balto-Slavic
Church Slavic sęštъ "wise," Lithuanian sintė́ti "to think"
septiembre m. (Noun) "September"
13th cent. Old Spanish setiembre. From Latin septembrem, accusative of september 'id.' From *septemo membris "of the seventh month," from septem "seven" (see siete) and mensis "month" (see mes).
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian setiembre, Galician setembro, Portuguese setembro, Catalan setembre, French septembre, Aromanian septemvriu, Romanian septembrie
séptimo (Ordinal Number) "seventh"
17th cent. loanword from Latin septimus 'id.,' from septem "seven" (see siete). It replaced the native word siedmo.
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese sétimo, French septime, Italian settimo
ser (Verb) "to be"
10th cent. Old Spanish seer. A collapse of Vulgar Latin sedere "to sit" and essere "to be" into a single verb. Already by the 4th cent., Iberian Vulgar Latin sedere was employed in the manner of Modern Spanish ser and not in the sense of sitting. For the etymology of sedere, see notes under sentar. Essere is from Latin esse 'id.' From Proto-Italic *es- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *h1es- 'id.'
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian ser, Portuguese ser, Galician ser, Catalan seure, French seoir, Italian sedere, Aromanian shideari, Romanian ședere, Sardinian sèere
serie f. (Noun) "series"
Very late 15th cent. From Latin series 'id.' from serere "to tie together." From Proto-Italic *ser-e/o- 'id.' see cerrar.
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese série, Catalan sèrie, French série, Italian serie
Italic
Oscan aserum "to lay"
Germanic
Gothic sarwa "armor," Old Norse sørvi "collar," Old High German saro "armor," Old English searu "art"
Balto-Slavic
Lithuanian sėris "thread"
Hellenic
Ancient Greek εἴρειν (eírein) "to knit," "to tie"
Tocharian
A ṣurm "motive," B ṣarm 'id.'