The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
sueldo m. (Noun) "salary"
12th cent. Originally meaning "coin." From Late Latin solidus 'id.,' but in Latin meaning "solid" (see sólido).
suelo m. (Noun) "floor," "ground"
12th cent. From Latin solum "bottom," "floor," "ground." From Proto-Italic *solo- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *sol-o- "living space." See also suelo.
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese solo, solho, Catalan sòl, French sol, Italian suolo, Romanian sol
Germanic
Old Norse salr "hall, "house," Old High German sal "hall," Old Saxon seli 'id.,' Old English sæl 'id.'
Balto-Slavic
Old Church Slavonic selo "field," "village," Russian seló "village," Old Czech selo "field," Polish sioɫo "soil," "village," Slovene sélọ "colony," "village," Lithuanian salà "island," "field"
sueño (1) m. (Noun) "sleep"
12th cent. From Latin somnus 'id.' From Proto-Italic *swepno- or *swopno- "sleep." From Proto-Indo-European *su̯épno- or *su̯opno- "sleep," from earlier *su̯ep-r̥ or *su̯op-r̥/*su̯p-n-os 'id.'
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian sueñu, Portuguese sono, Galician sono, Catalan son, French sommeil, Italian sonno, Aromanian somnu, Romanian somn, Sardinian sonnu
Celtic
Old Irish súan "sleep," Middle Welsh hun 'id.,' Middle Breton hun 'id.,' Old Cornish hun "drowsiness"
Germanic
Old Norse svefn "sleep," "dream," Old Saxon sweƀan "sleep," Old English swefn 'id.'
Albanian
Albanian gjumë "sleep"
Balto-Slavic
Old Church Slavonic sъnъ "sleep," Russian son 'id.,' Czech sen 'id.,' Polish sen 'id.,' Slovene sə̀n 'id.,' Lithuanian sãpnas "dream," Latvian 'id.'
Hellenic
Ancient Greek ὕπνος (hypnos) "sleep"
Armenian
Armenian k'own "sleep"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit svápna- "sleep," "dream," Avestan xvafna- 'id.'
Tocharian
A ṣpäṃ "sleep," B ṣpane 'id.'
The original word in Proto-Indo-European was *su̯ep-r̥ or *su̯op-r̥, an r/n-stem that was remodeled by analogy after a thematic vowel was added. See also sopor.
sueño (2) m. (Noun) "dream"
12th cent. From Latin somnium 'id.' From Proto-Italic *swepnjo- or *swopnjo- "dream." From Proto-Indo-European *su̯épno- or *su̯opno- "sleep" (also the origin of the other meaning of sueño) and *-i̯o-, a putative nominal derivational ending of unclear meaning. See soñar for further etymology.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian suañu, Portuguese sonho, Galician soño, French songe, Italian sogno, Sardinian sónniu
The -ium in somnium has an unclear history. It is not clear whether is was added during a pre-Latin period (for reasons unknown) or in Proto-Indo-European as an i̯o-derivation, if such a derivation truly existed. The i̯o-derivation may be an i-stem with a thematic vowel (see Meier-Brügger et al., 2003).
suerte f. (Noun) "luck"
10th cent. Old Spanish sorte. 12th cent. Old Spanish suert, suerte. From Latin sortem, accusative of sors "fate," "lottery ticket," "the response from the Oracles." From Proto-Italic *sorti- "joint." From Proto-Indo-European *sr̥-ti- 'id.' The first element is from earlier *ser- "to tie together" (see serie).
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian suerte, Portuguese sorte, Catalan sort, French sort, Italian sorte, Aromanian soarti, Romanian soartă, Sardinian solte
suficiente (Adjective) "sufficient"
From Latin sufficientem, accusative of sufficiens 'id.' From sufficere "to suffice." From sub- "under" (see so) and facere "to make" (see hacer).
Indo-European
Romance
French suffire
sugerir (Verb) "to suggest"
17th cent. From Latin suggerere 'id.,' composed of sub- "under" (see so) and gerere "to carry" (see -gero).
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese sugerir, Catalan suggerir, French suggérer
sugestión f. (Noun) "suggestion"
15th cent. From Latin suggestionem, accusative of suggestio 'id.' From the verb suggerere "to suggest" (see sugerir).
Indo-European
Romance
French suggestion
sujeto (1) m. (Noun) "subject"
From Latin subiectum "subject," "proposal." From subicere "to propose," composed of sub- "under" (see so) and iactare "to throw" (see echar).
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese sujeito, French sujet, Italian soggetto, Romanian subiect
sujeto (2) (Adjective) "attached"
From Latin subiectus "proposed." From subicere "to propose," composed of sub- "under" (see so) and iactare "to throw" (see echar).
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese sujeito, French sujet, Italian soggetto