The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
sorpresa f. (Noun) "surprise"
17th cent. Borrowed from French surprise 'id.' From Old French sorprendre "to overtake;" sor- is from Latin sur- (see sur-) and prendre "to take" is from Latin prendere 'id.' (see prender).
sospechar (Verb) "to suspect"
13th cent. From Latin suspectare 'id.' From suspicere "to suspect," "to surmise" and frequentive suffix -tare (see note under faltar). From sub- "under" (see so) and specere "to see." From Proto-Italic *spek-je/o- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *speḱ-i̯e/o- 'id.'
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese suspeitar
Germanic
Old High German spehōn "to spy"
Hellenic
Ancient Greek σκέπτεσθαι (sképtesthai) "to look around"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit páśyati, Avestan spasiia- "to discover"
sospechoso (Adjective) "suspicious"
14th cent. From sospechar.
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese suspeitar
soto m. (Noun) "grove of trees"
10th cent. From Latin saltus "forest," "ravine." Of unknown origin.
In use in 53 placenames throughout Spain, principally in Galicia and Asturias. Also found in the surnames Soto, Sotos, and del Soto.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian saltu, Portuguese salto, Galician salto, Catalan salt, French saut, Italian salto, Romanian salt
Basque
Basque zaltu "grove where cattle forage," borrowed from Latin saltus
stop m. (Noun) "stop," "stop sign"
Borrowed from English stop (Old English stoppian "to stop"). From Proto-West Germanic *stuppōn- 'id.' Of uncertain origin.
Indo-European
Germanic
Dutch stoppen "to stop," Old Saxon stuppōn 'id.,' Old High German stoppōn 'id.'
su (Possessive Pronoun) "his," "hers," "its;" "theirs"
Old Spanish sue. From Latin suam, feminine accusative of suus "his," "hers" (see suyo).
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian so, Portuguese seu, French son, Italian suo, Aromanian seu, Romanian său, Sardinian su
subir (Verb) "to raise"
12th cent. From Latin subire 'id.' From sub- "under" (see so) and ire "to go" (see ir).
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian xubir, Portuguese subir, Galician subir, French subir, Italian subire, Romanian sui
suceder (Verb) "to succeed (during a chronology of events)"
15th cent. From Latin succedere 'id.' From su(b)- "under" (see so) and cedere "to cede" (see ceder).
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese suceder, French succéder, Italian succedere
suegra f. (Noun) "mother-in-law"
12th cent. From Vulgar Latin socra 'id.' (Appendix Probi, 3rd or 4th cent.: socrus non socra "[the word for mother-in-law is] socrus, not socra"). There was a tendency in Vulgar Latin to view all words ending in -us as grammatically masculine and -a as feminine, and this word's ending was changed to reflect the biological sex of the referent. From Latin socrus 'id.' From Proto-Italic *swekru- 'id.' (compare Proto-Italic *swekuro- "father-in-law"). From Proto-Indo-European *su̯éḱruh2- 'id.' (compare Proto-Indo-European *su̯éḱu̯ro- "father-in-law").
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian suegra, Portuguese sogra, Galician sogra, Catalan sogra, Italian suocera, Aromanian soacrã, Romanian soacră, Sardinian socra
Celtic
Middle Welsh chewgr "mother-in-law," Old Cornish hweger 'id.'
Germanic
Old High German swigar "mother-in-law," Old English sweger 'id.'
Balto-Slavic
Old Church Slavonic svekrꙑ "mother-in-law" Russian svekróvʹ 'id.,' BCS svȅkrva 'id.,' Slovak svokra 'id.'
Armenian
Old Armenian skesur "mother-in-law"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit śvaśrū́ "mother-in-law"
Note that the beginning of the word looks mysteriously like other words for 'oneself,' *su̯e- (see note under se- (1)). To this, Beekes notes: "The word probably contains the reflexive * sue (cf. ἀέλιοι ); however, the ending is obscure." ~ R. S. P. Beekes, Etymological Dictionary of Greek (2014)
suegro m. (Noun) "father-in-law"
12th cent. Derived from suegra, and not directly from Latin socer "father-in-law" as is sometimes thought.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian suegru, Portuguese sogro, Galician sogro, Catalan sogre, Italian suocero, Aromanian socru, Romanian socru, Sardinian socru, sogru
Germanic
Gothic swaihra "father-in-law," Old Swedish svǣr 'id.,' Elfdalian swäre 'id.,' Old High German swehur 'id.,' Old English swehor 'id.'
Albanian
Albanian vjehërr "father-in-law"
Balto-Slavic
Old Church Slavonic svekrъ "father-in-law," Russian svëkor 'id.,' Czech svekr 'id.,' Slovene svę́kər 'id.,' Lithuanian šẽšuras 'id.'
Hellenic
Ancient Greek ἑκυρός (ekurós) "father-in-law"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit śváśura- "father-in-law," Young Avestan xvasura- 'id.'