The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
pelea f. (Noun) "fight"
12th cent. From pelear.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian pelu, Portuguese pelo, Galician pelo, Catalan pèl, French poil, Italian pelo, Aromanian per, Romanian păr, Sardinian pilu
pelear (Verb) "to fight"
12th cent. Old Spanish peliare. Spelling pelear beginning 14th cent. Originally meaning "to pull hair." From pelo.
pelgar m. (Noun) "good-for-nothing"
Origin uncertain. Phonologically, the word could derive from the unattested Old Spanish word *pelga, meaning "cattle hitch" (from Latin pedicare "fetters"), which today survives only in the Salamancan dialect as pielga, but the semantics are obscure.
película f. (Noun) "film"
Borrowed from Latin pellicula "skin" in 1936, used in the sense of a layer of physical film. For the origin of pellicula, see piel.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian pelleya, pelleyu, Portuguese película, French pellicule, Italian pellicola, Romanian peliculă
peligrar (Verb) "to be in danger"
Metathesis of 12th cent. Old Spanish periglar. A verb formed from peligro.
peligro m. (Noun) "danger"
Metathesis of 12th cent. Old Spanish periglo. From Latin periculum "trial," "risk." From Proto-Italic *per-ei-tlo- "experience." From the Proto-Indo-European verb *pérh3-i̯- "to try." Earlier root *pérh3- may have meant "to go forward."
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian peligru, Portuguese perigo, Galician perigo, Catalan perill, French péril, Italian pericolo, Romanian pericol, Sardinian perículu
Celtic
Gaulish ieuru "he offered," Old Irish ernaid "to grant"
Hellenic
Ancient Greek ἔπορον (époron) "provided"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit pr̥ṇā́ti "he gives"
peligroso (Adjective) "dangerous"
Metathesis of 12th cent. Old Spanish perigloso. From periglo "danger" (see peligro) and -oso, an adjective-forming suffix.
pelleja f. (Noun) "hide," "skin"
13th cent. From Latin pellicula "piece of skin," diminutive of pellis "skin" (see piel).
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian pelleya, Portuguese película, French pellicule, Italian pellicola, Romanian peliculă
According to Varro (De Lingua Latina), pelliculum was a strictly rural term, never used by the educated or urbane. "In Atellan farces you may observe that rustics say they have brought home a pelliculum instead of a scortum."
pelo m. (Noun) "hair"
12th cent. From Latin pilus 'id.' Of unknown origin. Perhaps borrowed from a non-Indo-European language.
Indo-European
Romance
ASturian pelu, Portuguese pelo, Galician pelo, Catalan pèl, French poil, Italian pelo, Aromanian per, Romanian păr, Sardinian pilu
Italic
Latin pila "ball," compilare "to steal"
pelota (1) f. (Noun) "ball"
13th cent. Old Spanish pellota. Borrowed from either Old French pelote or Old Occitan pelota 'id.' It replaced the native Old Spanish pella (pellota also existed, though rarely used). From Vulgar Latin *pilotta "little ball," a diminutive of Latin pila "ball." Of unknown origin.
Indo-European
Romance
Catalan pila, French pile, Italian pila
Italic
Latin pilus "hair," compilare "to steal"