The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
-patía, -pato- (Suffix, Combining Form) "ailment," "feeling," "suffering"
From Ancient Greek πάθος (páthos) "experience," "suffering," derived from the verb πᾰ́σχειν (páskein) "to experience," "to suffer." The grades in Ancient Greek imply the word is native and Lithuanian kenčiù "to suffer" may be a cognate, in which case see Rix, et al. (2001).
pato (1) (Noun) "duck"
Very late 15th cent. Origin uncertain. Probably from Anadlusian Arabic páṭṭ "duck," from Arabic baṭṭ "duck," but the oldest Spanish texts use pato to mean "goose." The Arabic word was borrowed from Persian bat "duck."
Indo-European
Romance
Old Portuguese pato, Galician pato
pato (2) m. (Noun) "undeserved punishment"
Used only in the phrase pagar el pato. Origin uncertain. Perhaps from Latin pactum "agreement" (see pacto).
pavo m. (Noun) "turkey"
Very early 14th cent. Old Spanish pavo "peacock." When Spanish colonists first encountered the turkey, a strictly New World animal, they employed an already existing word to describe what they saw, and thus the meaning of pavo shifted. The meaning of "peacock" is preserved in pavo real. From Latin pavo "peacock," which was possibly borrowed from Ancient Greek τᾰώς (taós) "peacock," but ultimately of unknown origin as the word entered Europe from a language in Asia.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian pavu, Galician pavo, Portuguese pavão, Catalan paó, French paon, Italian pavone, Aromanian pãun, Romanian păun, Sardinian paboni
pavo real m. (Noun) "peacock"
18th cent. When Spanish colonists first settled the New World, they used an existing word pavo meaning "peacock" to describe turkeys. Over time, the meaning of the word shifted towards "turkey" until pavo was no longer recognized as the proper word for peacocks. Instead, speakers said pavo real for the brightly colored bird, in the sense of saying an 'actual peacock.'
paz f. (Noun) "peace"
12th cent. From Latin pax 'id.' From Proto-Italic *pāk- "agreement." From Proto-Indo-European *peh2ḱ-
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian paz, Portuguese paz, Galician paz, Catalan pau, French paix, Italian pace, Romanian pace, Sardinian pache
Italic
Umbrian pacer "peace," Marsian pacre 'id.,' Paelignian pacrid "by peace"
Germanic
Gothic fagrs "fit," Old Norse fagr "beautiful," Old High German fuogen "to join," Old Saxon fōgian 'id.,' Old English fēgan 'id.' (English to fay)
Hellenic
Attic πήττω (pétto) "I join"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit pā́śa- "snare," Khotanese pāsa- "cord"
pecho m. (Noun) "breast," "chest"
12th cent. From Latin pectus 'id.' From Proto-Italic *pektos- 'id.' Of unknown origin. The cognate in Old Irish ucht "breast" suggests that this is either a mutual innovation or cognate loanword from an outside source within the Italo-Celtic subgroup.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian pechu, Portuguesepeito, Galician peito, Catalan pit, French pis, poitrine, Italian petto, Aromanian cheptu, Romanian pet, Sardinian petus
Celtic
Old Irish ucht "breast" (< Proto-Celtic *fextu- < *pektu-)
pedazo m. (Noun) "piece"
12th cent. Old Spanish pedaço. From Vulgar Latin petaccium 'id.,' from Latin pitaccium "piece (of cloth)." Borrowed from Ancient Greek πιττάκιον ‎(pittákion) "scrap (of garment);" "tablet;" "note." Of unknown origin.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian pedazu, piozu, Portuguese pedaço, Catalan pedaç, Italian petacciola
peder, peer (Verb) "to fart"
15th cent. From Latin pedere 'id.' From Proto-Italic *pezd-e/o- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *pesd-e/o- 'id.'
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian pear, Portuguese peidar, Galician peidar, peidear
Balto-Slavic
Russian bzdetʹ "to fart silently," BCS bàzdeti "to smell bad," Polish bździć "to fart," Lithuanian bezdė́ti "to fart silently," Latvian bezdêt 'id.'
Hellenic
Ancient Greek βδέειν (bdéein) "to fart"
pedir (Verb) "to request"
12th cent. From Latin petere "to seek." From Proto-Italic *pet-e/o- 'id.' Perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *pt-i̯ "to fly (towards)," but the sense evolution is obscure.
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese pedir, Romanian peți, Sardinian pedire
Italic
Venetic ekvopetaris? "of a horse-rider"