The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
par m. (Noun, Adjective) "pair;" "equal"
12th cent. 'From Latin par 'id.' From Proto-Italic *parVs 'id.' Of unknown origin.
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese par, French pair, Italian paio
Italic
Umbrian pars "prescription"
para (1) (Preposition) "for"
12th cent. Old Spanish pora from por and a.
Para (2) (Toponym)
The name of a village in Burgos. Of uncertain origin.
parábola f. (Noun) "parable"
16th cent. borrowing from Ancient Greek παραβολή (parabolé) "comparison;" "parable." From πᾰρᾰ́ (pará) "beside" and βάλλειν (bállein) "to throw," combined for the sense of placing two things side-by-side for the purpose of comparison. For the continued etymology of πᾰρᾰ́, see relevant notes under pre-; for the etymology of βάλλειν, see diablo.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian pallabra, Portuguese palavra, Galician palabra, Catalan paraula, French palabre, Italian parola, Sardinian paragula
parar (1) (Verb) "to stop;" "to place a bet"
10th cent. Originally meaning "to situate." From Latin parare "to prepare." The sense evolution was from positioning an object to keeping the object still. From Proto-Italic *parā-je/o- "to prepare." A derivation of Proto-Indo-European *perh3- "to provide" (see also parir).
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese parar, French parer, Italian parare
Celtic
Gaulish ieuru "he offered," Old Irish ernaid "to grant"
Hellenic
Ancient Greek ἔπορον (époron) "provided"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit pr̥ṇā́ti "he gives"
parar (2) m. (Noun) (game) "lansquenet"
From parar (1) in a secondary sense of placing a bet.
parecer m. (Verb, Noun) "to seem;" "opinion"
As a verb, first attested in the 10th cent.; as a noun, 16th cent. From Vulgar Latin *parescere 'id.,' from Latin parere "to appear" with the inchoative infix -scere (see -ecer). For the etymology of parere, see parar (1).
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese parar, French parer, Italian parare
pared f. (Noun) "wall"
11th cent. From Latin parietem, accusative of paries 'id.' Of unknown origin.
Also the origin of the names of towns in Cuenca, Mdrid, Toledo, and Palencia.
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese parede, Galician parede, Catalan paret, French paroi, Italian parete, Romanian parete, Sardinian parada
pareja f. (Noun) "pair"
12th cent. From Vulgar Latin *paricula "little pair," a diminutive of Latin par "pair" (see par).
parir (Verb) "to bear (children)," "to birth"
11th cent. From Latin parire 'id.' From Proto-Italic *per-i- "to bring forth," or a more general meaning of "to bear" not exclusive to childbirth. From Proto-Indo-European *pérh3-i̯- 'id.' From the root *perh3- of the same meaning.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian parir, Portuguese parir, Galician parir, Catalan parir
Italic
Faliscan amparihmu "he erected" (*an- "on" and par-ī-je- "furnished")
Celtic
Gaulish ieuru "he offered," Old Irish ernaid "to grant"
Hellenic
Ancient Greek ἔπορον (époron) "provided"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit pr̥ṇā́ti "he gives"