The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
próximo (Adjective) "next"
12th cent. From Latin proximus "nearest," earlier *propsimos, a superlative built on Proto-Indo-European *própro "on and on." See also pro-.
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese próximo, Catalan pròxim, Italian prossimo, Romanian proxim
proyectar (Verb) "to project"
From Latin proiectare 'id.' From either proiectus "projection" or proicere "to thrust" and -tare, a frequentive suffix (see note under faltar). Either way ultimately from pro- "for" (see pro-) and iacare "to throw" (see echar).
proyecto m. (Noun) "project"
From Latin proiectum 'id.' From proicere "to project," "to thrust" (see proyectar).
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese projecto French projet, Italian progetto, Romanian proiect
prueba f. (Noun) "proof;" "test"
From Late Latin proba 'id.,' from probare "to approve," but also "to test" (see probar).
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian prueba, Portuguese prova, Galician proba, Catalan prova, French preuve, Italian prova, Romanian probă, Sardinian proa
psico- (Prefix) "mind," "mental state"
Taken from Ancient Greek ψῡχή ‎(psykhé) "mind," "soul," popularly used in compounds starting in the 18th cent. From ψῡ́χειν (psykhein) "to breathe," "to blow." Of unknown origin. The original meaning of ψῡ́χειν was probably "to cool (by blowing air)."
psicología f. (Noun) "psychology"
18th cent. Created from Ancient Greek to mean "the study of the mind;" from ψυχή ‎(psukhé) "soul," "mind" (see psico-) and -λογία (logía) "study of" (see -logía).
público (Adjective, Noun) "public"
10th cent. An adjectival from Latin publicus 'id.' Old Latin poplicus. From Proto-Italic *poplo- "army," also whence pueblo. Of unknown origin. Well attested in Italic languages. Probably borrowed from an outside source - perhaps Etruscan.
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese público, French public, Italian pubblico, Romanian public
Italic
Umbrian pumplum "able-bodied people"
Tyrsenian
pupluna?, toponym of unknown meaning
pudor m. (Noun) "modesty"
Early 17th cent. From Latin pudor 'id.,' from the verb pudere "to feel shame," "to be ashamed." From Proto-Italic *pud-ē- 'id.' Of unknown origin, perhaps Proto-Indo-European *(s)peu̯-d- "to hit."
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese pudor, Catalan pudor, French pudeur, Italian pudore, Romanian pudoare
pueblo m. (Noun) "people;" "town"
12th cent. From Latin populus "people." From Proto-Italic *poplo- "army." Of unknown origin, possibly from Etruscan.
Origin of Puebla and Pueblo, the names of towns throughout the Spanish-speaking world.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian pueblu, Portuguese povo, Galician pobo, Catalan poble, French peuple, Italian popolo, Aromanian popul, Romanian popor, Sardinian pobulu
Italic
Umbrian pumplum "able-bodied people"
Tyrsenian
pupluna?, toponym of unknown meaning
puente m. (Noun) "bridge"
11th cent. From Latin pontem, accusative of pons 'id.' From Proto-Italic *pont- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *pónt-h1- "road."
Use of puente in the feminine is a poetic extension and mostly isolated to the 19th cent.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian ponte, Portuguese ponte, Galician ponte, Catalan pont, French pont, Italian ponte, Aromanian punte, Romanian punte, Sardinian ponte
Balto-Slavic
Old Church Slavonic pǫtь "road," Russian put' "way," Czech pouť "pilgrimage," Polish pąć "way," Slovene pǫ́t "way," Old Prussian pintis "road," "way"
Hellenic
Ancient Greek πάτος (pátos) "road," πόντος (póntos) "sea"
Armenian
Armenian hown "ford"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit pánthā- "road," Old Avestan paθō "by the road"