The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
nueve (Cardinal Number) "nine"
12th cent. From Latin novem 'id.' From Proto-Italic *newn̥ 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *h1neu̯n 'id.'
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese nove, Galician nove, Catalan nou, French neuf, Italian nove, Aromanian noauã, Romanian nouă, Sardiniannoi, nobe
Celtic
Old Irish nóin "nine," Old Welsh nauou 'id.,' Old Breton nau 'id.,' Cornish naw 'id.'
Germanic
Gothic niun "nine," Old Norse níu 'id.,' Old High German niun 'id.,' Old Saxon nigun 'id.,' English nine
Albanian
Albanian nëndë "nine"
Balto-Slavic
Old Church Slavonic devętь "nine," Russian dévjat' 'id.,' Czech devět 'id.,' Polish dziewięć 'id.,' Slovene dévet 'id.,' Lithuanian devynì 'id.,' Latvian deviņi 'id.'
Hellenic
Ancient Greek ἐννέα (ennéa) "nine"
Armenian
Armenian inn "nine"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit náva "nine," Avestan nauua 'id.'
Tocharian
A ñu "nine," B ñu 'id.'
nuevo (Adjective) "new"
11th cent. From Latin novus 'id.' From Proto-Italic *nowo- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *neu̯o- 'id.' From *nu̯ "now."
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian nuevu, Portuguese novo, Galician novo, Catalan nou, French neuf, Italian novo, Aromanian nãu, Romanian nou, Sardinian nobu
Italic
Umbrian nuvis "new"
Celtic
Celtiberian nouiza "new" (meaning uncertain), Gaulish Nouio- "new," Old Irish nuë 'id.,' Old Welsh newydd 'id.,' Old Breton nouuid 'id.,' Cornish newyth 'id.'
Germanic
Gothic niujis "new," Old Norse nýr 'id.,' Old High German niuwi 'id.,' Old Saxon niuwi 'id.,' English new
Balto-Slavic
Old Church Slavonic novъ "new," Russian nóvyj 'id.,' Czech nový 'id.,' Polish nowy 'id.,' Slovene nòv 'id.,' Lithuanian naũjas 'id.'
Hellenic
Ancient Greek νέος (néos) "new," Mycenaean ne-wo- 'id.,' Cyprus νεϝό- (newó) 'id.'
Armenian
Armenian nor "new"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit náva- "new," Young Avestan nauua- 'id.'
Tocharian
A ñu "new," B ñuwe 'id.'
número m. (Noun) "number"
15th cent. borrowing from Latin numerus 'id.' It replaced an earlier word nombre "number," borrowed from Old Catalan nombre. From Proto-Italic *nomero- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *neme-e/os- "distributed amount." From a root *nem- "to allot."
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian númberu, Portuguese número, Galician número, Catalan número, French numéro, Italian numero, Romanian număr, Sardinian númeru
Italic
Latin nemus "forest"
Hellenic
Ancient Greek νέμω (némo) "I distribute," "I pasture," νομός (nomós) "pasture," "province"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit námas- "worship," Avestan nəmah- "homage"
nunca (Adverb) "never"
12th cent. Old Spanish nunqua. From Latin numquam 'id.,' a negation of umquam "ever" with ne- (see ni). Latin umquam is from Proto-Italic *kwumk2ām 'id.' From *kwum "ever" and reinforced by *kwām "by what" (see cuan). Proto-Italic *kwum is from Proto-Indo-European *kwo-m "ever," a *kwo- pronominal stem. See also cuando, cuan, cuanto, quien, que.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian nunca, Portuguese nunca, Galician nunca
The Latin word umquam, not negated, survived in other Romance languages but not in Spanish (Italian unqua, French onc, and Romanian încă).