The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
norte m. (Noun) "north"
Late 15th cent. Borrowed from Old French nort 'id.,' borrowed from Old English norþ (north). From Proto-Germanic *nurþera- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *h1n̥r-tero- 'id.'
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian norte, Portuguese norte, Galician norte, Catalan nord, French nord, Italian nord, Romanian nord
Italic
Oscan nertrak "left," Umbrian nertru 'id.'
Germanic
Old Norse norðr "north," Middle High German norder "north," English north
Hellenic
Ancient Greek ἔνεροι (éneroi) "those below,
Tocharian
B ñor "below"
nos (Personal Pronoun) "(to) us"
10th cent. From Latin nos "we," "us." From Proto-Italic *nōs 'id.' Taken from the accusative in Proto-Indo-European *nōs 'id.'
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian nós, Portuguese nós, Galician nós, Catalan nós, French nous, Italian noi, Aromanian noi, Romanian noi, Sardinian nois
nosotros (Personal Pronoun) "we"
14th cent. From Old Spanish nós "we" and otros "others." See nos and otro respectively.
nota f. (Noun) "note;" "grade"
13th cent. From Latin nota "note." Probably originally meaning "sign" or "signal," as notare meant "to mark" (in order to be noticed). Of unknown origin.
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese nota, French note
noticia f. (Noun) "message;" "news," "piece of news"
13th cent. From Latin notitia "fame," "notice." From notus "known," the passive participle of noscere "to know" (see conocer for further etymology).
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese notícia, French notice
noviembre m. (Noun) "November"
13th cent. From Latin novembrem, accusative of november 'id.' From *novem membris "of the ninth month." From novem "nine" (see nueve) and mensis "month" (see mes).
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian noviembre, Galician novembro, Portuguese novembro, Catalan novembre, French novembre, Italian novembre, Aromanian nuembru, Romanian noiembrie
novio (Noun) "romantic partner;" (masc.) "groom"
13th cent. From Vulgar Latin novius "newlywed," from Latin novus "new" (see nuevo).
nudo (1) (Adjective) "naked"
13th cent. From Latin nudus 'id.' From Proto-Italic *noweþo- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *nogw-odho- 'id.,' derived from *nogws 'id.'
Indo-European
Celtic
Old Irish nocht "naked," Middle Welsh noeth 'id.,' Old Breton noit 'id.,' Cornish noeth 'id.'
Germanic
Gothic naqaþs "naked," Old Norse nøkkviðr "naked," Old High German nackot "naked," Old English nacod 'id.' (English naked)
Balto-Slavic
Old Church Slavonic nagъ "naked," Russian nagój 'id.,' Czech nahý 'id.,' Polish nagi 'id.,' Slovene nȃg 'id.,' Old Prussian nognan "leather," Lithuanian núogas "naked," Latvian nuôgs 'id.'
Armenian
Armenian merk "naked"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit nagná- "naked," Young Avestan maɣna- 'id.'
nudo (2) m. (Noun) "knot"
13th cent. From Vulgar Latin *nudus 'id.,' from Latin nodus 'id.' The sound change from -o- to -u- is not understood. From Proto-Italic *nōdo- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *neh3-do- 'id.'
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian nudu, Catalan nu, French nœud, Italian nodo, Romanian nod, Aromanian nod, Sardinian nou
Italic
Latin nassa "wicker basket fish trap"
Celtic
Old Irish nascaid "to bind," Middle Breton nasca 'id.'
Germanic
Gothic nati "net," Old Norse net 'id.,' Old High German nezzi 'id.,' Old Saxon netti 'id.,' English net
Albanian
Albanian nyje "knot" (borrowed from Vulgar Latin *nudus/i> 'id.')
nuestro (Possessive Pronoun) "our," "ours"
12th cent. From Latin nostrum, accusative case of noster 'id.' From Proto-Italic *nos-tero- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *n̥s-tero- 'id.,' from *nōs- "us" and comparative suffix *-tero- (see -tr-).
Variants
Zamora nueso, probably a modern reflex of nuesso (14th cent.).
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian nuesu, Portuguese nosso, Galician noso, Catalan nostre, French notre, Italian nostro, Aromanian nostru, Romanian nostru, Sardinian nostru