The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
-no Adjective-forming suffix.
From Latin -nus 'id.' From Proto-Italic *-no- 'id.' From late Proto-Indo-European *-n-ó- 'id.'
Indo-European
Germanic
Gothic -an, Old English -en, Old High German -an, -en, Old Saxon -an
Balto-Slavic
Old Church Slavonic -nъ, -nije, Russian -nyj, -n'e, Czech -ný, -ní, Slovak -ný, Polish -ny, Slovene -n, Bulgarian -n
Hellenic
Ancient Greek -νος ‎(nos)
no (Adverb) "no," "not"
10th cent. Old Spanish non. From Latin non 'id.," from Old Latin noenum "not one," from ne "not" and oinos "one" (see uno).
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian nun, Portuguese não, Galician non, Catalan no, French non, Italian no, Aromanian nu, Romanian nu, Sardinian no
nocente (Adjective) "harmful;" "guilty"
From Latin nocentem, accusative of nocens 'id.' From nocere "to harm." From Proto-Italic *nok-eje- "to cause death," especially a murderous death. From Proto-Indo-European *noḱ-ei̯e- "to cause death," but originally a euphemism that meant "to cause to disappear." Derived from the root *neḱ- "death," "disappearance."
Indo-European
Romance
Galician nocer, Catalan noure, French nuire, Italian nuocere
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit nāśáya- "to make disappear," Old Persian vināθayatiy "he damages"
noche f. (Noun) "night"
12th cent. From Latin noctem, accusative case of nox 'id.' From Proto-Italic *nok-t- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *nógwh-t- 'id.'
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian nueche, Portuguese noite, Galician noite, Catalan nit, French nuit, Italian notte, Aromanian noapti, Romanian noapte, Sardinian noti
Celtic
Gaulish nox "night," Old Irish innocht "tonight," Old Welsh he-noid 'id.,' Middle Breton hanoez 'id.,' Cornish haneth 'id.'
Germanic
Gothic nahts "night," Old Norse nǫ́tt 'id.,' Old High German naht 'id.,' Old Saxon naht 'id.,' Old English næht 'id.' (English night)
Albanian
Albanian natë "night"
Balto-Slavic
Old Church Slavonic noštь "night," Russian noč' 'id.,' Czech noc 'id.,' Polish noc 'id.,' Slovene nọ̑č 'id.,' Old Prussian naktin 'id.,' Lithuanian naktìs 'id.,' Latvian nakts 'id.'
Hellenic
Ancient Greek νύξ (nyks) "night"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit nákt- "night"
Tocharian
B nekcīye "at night"
nombre m. (Noun) "name;" "noun"
12th cent. Old Spanish nomne, from Vulgar Latin *nomine, from Latin nomen 'id.' From Proto-Italic *nōm-n- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *h3neh3-mn- 'id.'
Variants
11th cent. Old Spanish nomen, Colunga nome
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian nome, Portuguese nome, Galician nome, Catalan nom, French nom, Italian nome, Aromanian numã, Romanian nume, Sardinian nomene
Italic
Oscan numneís "of the name," Umbrian numen "name"
Celtic
Gaulish anuana "name," Old Irish ainm 'id.,' Old Welsh anu 'id.,' Middle Breton hanu 'id.,' Cornish enw 'id.'
Germanic
Gothic namo "name," Old Norse nafn 'id.,' Old High German namo 'id.,' Old Saxon namo 'id.,' Old English nama 'id.' (English name)
Albanian
Albanian emër "name"
Balto-Slavic
Old Church Slavonic imę "name," Russian ímja 'id.,' Czech jméno 'id.,' Polish imię 'id.,' Slovene imę̑ 'id.,' Old Prussian emmens 'id.'
Hellenic
Ancient Greek ὄνομα (ónoma) "name"
Phrygian
Phrygian onoman "name"
Armenian
Armenian anown "name"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit nā́man- "name," Avestan nāman- 'id.'
Tocharian
A ñom "name," B ñem 'id.'
Compare dialect variant Colunga nome and textual variant Fuero de Avilés nomen (11th cent.) which seem to preserve the middle vowel in Vulgar Latin *nomine.
The Indo-Europeans ritualized the application of a name to a newborn and in Proto-Indo-European, the phrase for naming a newborn was "to make a name." A mother of a newborn was given nine days to recover, then after she would name the child for his or her name-day.
-nomía (Suffix) "joined by laws," "bound by norms"
Borrowed from Greek -νομία (nomía) 'id.,' from Ancient Greek νόμος (nómos) "law." From the verb νέμω (némo) "I distribute" (see Némesis).
nominar (Verb) "to name"
From Latin nominare 'id.,' a verb derived from nomen "name" (see nombre).
nona f. (Noun) "grandma"
13th cent. Borrowed from Latin nonna "old woman," "wet nurse." Also note 12th cent. Old Spanish nana "married woman."
Indo-European
Romance
French nonne, Italian nonna
Despite the semantic argument that the word is native to Spanish, and not borrowed from Latin, the word did not undergo palatalization. Fascinatingly, a cousin of the word is ñoño, which palatalized twice - generally against the norm in Spanish.
norma f. (Noun) "rule"
17th cent. borrowing from Latin norma "carpenter's square," but also "standard." Perhaps borrowed from Etruscan, which in turn borrowed from Ancient Greek γνώμων ‎(gnṓmōn) "judge."
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese norma, Italian norma
If norma does come from γνώμων, the ultimate etymology comes from PIE *ǵneh3- "to know" (see conocer for further discussion of this root).
normal (Adjective) "normal"
19th cent. From Latin normalis 'id.,' from Latin norma "carpenter's square," but also "standard" (see norma).
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese normal, French normal, Italian normale, Romanian normal