The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
mergo m. (Noun) "cormorant"
From Latin mergus 'id.' Literally meaning "the one who dives." From mergere "to plunge." From Proto-Italic *mezg-e/o- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *mesg-e/o- 'id.'
Indo-European
Balto-Slavic
Lithuanian mazgóti "to wash," Latvian mazgât 'id.'
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit májjanti "they plunge"
merienda f. (Noun) small lunch; "snack;" "picnic"
13th cent. From Latin merenda 'id.,' from merere "to deserve" (see merecer).
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese merenda, Galician merenda, Catalan berena, Old French marende, Italian merenda, Aromanian mirindi, Romanian merinda, Sardinian merenda
mes m. (Noun) "month"
12th cent. From Latin mensis "moon," "month." From Proto-Italic *mēns- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *meh1-n-s- 'id.' Probably from *meh1- "to measure" (see médico, medir).
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian mes, Portuguese mês, Galician mes, Catalan mes, French mois, Italian mese, Aromanian mes, Sardinian mese
Italic
Umbrian menzne "by the moon," Marsian mesene "on the month"
Celtic
Old Irish "month," Middle Welsh mis 'id.,' Old Breton mis 'id.,' Old Cornish mis 'id.'
Germanic
Gothic mena "moon," Old Norse máni 'id.,' Old High German māno 'id.,' Old Saxon māno 'id.,' Old English mōna (English moon)
Albanian
Albanian muaj "month"
Balto-Slavic
Old Church Slavonic měsęcь "month," "moon," Russian mésjac "month," Czech měsíc "month," Slovene mẹ̑sec "month," "moon," Old Prussian menig "moon," Lithuanian mė́nesis "moon," "month," Latvian mẽness "moon"
Hellenic
Ancient Greek μήν (més) "moon," Attic μείς (meís) 'id.'
Armenian
Armenian amis "month"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit mā́s- "moon," "month," Old Avestan mā̊ 'id.'
Tocharian
A mañ "moon," "month," B meñe 'id.'
In most Indo-European languages, the word for "moon" mirrors the word for "month." The moon derives from *meh1- "to measure" due to its role as a conceptual marker of the month.
mesa f. (Noun) "table"
10th cent. From Vulgar Latin mesa 'id.' From Latin mensa 'id.,' from tabula mensa meaning "measuring board." For further etymology of tabula "board," see tabla. Mensa "measuring" derives from metiri "to measure" (see medir).
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian mesa, Portuguese mesa, French moise, Italian mensa, Aromanian measã, Romanian masă, Sardinian mesa
In the 3rd or 4th cent. text Appendix Probi we find the line: mensa non mesa "[the word for 'table' is] mensa, not mesa." The author's spelling correction proves how the word was pronounced by common speakers, and offers a rare glimpse of the evolution of Latin into Romance languages such as Spanish.
meter (Verb) "to send"
12th cent. From Latin mittere "to send," but originally "to give." From Proto-Italic *meit-e/o- 'id.' The geminate -tt- in Latin is mysterious but note Archaic Latin mitat "he sends." From Proto-Indo-European *mei̯th2- "to exchange."
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese meter, Galician meter, Catalan metre, French mettre, Italian mettere, Sardinian míntere
Italic
South Picene meitims "monument"
Germanic
Gothic in-maidjan "to change"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit methete "he becomes hostile," Young Avestan paiti-miθnāiti "sends away"
metro (1) m. (Noun) "meter"
Late 18th cent. Either borrowed from French mètre 'id.' and then from Ancient Greek μέτρον ‎(métron) "measure" or borrowed directly from Ancient Greek, bypassing French. From Proto-Indo-European *mh1-tro- "measurement." From the root *meh1- "to measure" (see also medir).
Indo-European
Romance
French mètre, Italian metro
Celtic
Old Irish midithir "to measure," Middle Welsh meðu "to think," meddu "rule," Middle Cornish medhes "to say"
Germanic
Gothic mitan "to measure," Old Norse meta "to evaluate," Old High German mezzan "to measure," Old English metan 'id.' (English to measure)
Hellenic
Ancient Greek μέδομαι (médomai) "to care for"
Armenian
Armenian mit-kʿ "mind"
Indo-Iranian
Young Avestan vī-māδaiiaṇta "they must measure"
metro (2) m. (Noun) "subway"
Apocopation of ferrocarril metropolitano.
metropolitano m. (Adjective, Noun) "metropolitan;" "subway"
Very late 15th cent. An adjectival borrowed as a learned form from Late Latin metropolitanus "metropolitan," from metropolis "metropolis." Borrowed from Ancient Greek μητρόπολις ‎(metrópolis) "one's home city," literally "mother-city." From μήτηρ ‎(méter) "mother" and πόλις ‎(pólis) "city" (see polis). Μήτηρ, with an attestation in Mycenaean ma-te, is from Proto-Indo-European *meh2-ter "mother." See madre.
Indo-European
Italic
Oscan maatreís "of the mother," Umbrian matres 'id.,' Faliscan mate "mother," South Picene matereíh "to the mother"
Celtic
Gaulish matir "mother," Celtiberian matrubos "mothers," Old Irish máithir "mother"
Germanic
Old Norse móðir "mother," Old High German muoter 'id.,' Old Dutch muoder 'id.,' Old Saxon mōdar 'id.,' Old Frisian mōder 'id.,' Old English mōdor (English mother)
Albanian
Albanian motër "sister"
Balto-Slavic
Old Church Slavonic mati "mother," Lithuanian mótė 'id.'
Hellenic
Ancient Greek μήτηρ (méter) "mother," Mycenaean ma-te-re 'id.'
Phrygian
Phrygian ματαρ (matar) "mother"
Messapian
Messapian matura "mother"
Armenian
Armenian mayr "mother"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit mātár- "mother," Avestan mātar- 'id.'
Tocharian
A mācar "mother," B mācer 'id.'
México m. (Noun, Toponym) "Mexico"
From Nahuatl mexihco, metzxicco; a name for the Mexican nation, the Aztec altepetl, and the Valley of Mexico. In Nahuatl literally meaning "in the belly button of the moon." Composed of metz "moon," xic "belly button," and the locative suffix -co.
mi (Pronoun) "my"
Apocopation of mío.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian míu, Portuguese meu, Galician meu, Catalan meu, French mon, Italian mio, Aromanian njeu, Romanian meu, Sardinian meu