The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
me (Pronoun) "me"
From Latin me 'id.' From Proto-Italic *, me (unstressed) 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *h1me 'id.'
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese me, Galician me, French me, Italian mi, Aromanian mi, Romanian
media f. (Noun) "average;" "half of an hour"
17th cent. From Latin media "middle." From Proto-Italic *meþiā 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *medhi̯-eh2- 'id.' From an archaic stem *me- "middle." See also medio.
Indo-European
Italic
Oscan mefiaí "on the middle," South Picene mefiín 'id.'
Celtic
Gaulish medio- "mid-," Old Irish mid- 'id.'
Germanic
Gothic midjis "middle," Old Norse miðr 'id.,' Old High German mitti 'id.' Old Saxon middi, Old English midde 'id.' (English mid-)
Balto-Slavic
Old Church Slavonic meždaxъ "alleys," Russian mežá "boundary," Czech meze 'id.,' Polish miedza "border," Slovene méja "grove," Old Prussian median "wood," Lithuanian mẽdžias "forest," Latvian mežs "wood"
Hellenic
Ancient Greek μέσος (mésos) "middle"
Armenian
Armenian mēǰ "middle"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit mádhya- "middle," Old Avestan maidiia- 'id.'
mediar (Verb) "to mediate;" "to be in the middle"
From Latin mediare "to halve," "to divide." A verb formed from medius "middle" (see medio).
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese mear, French moyer, Italian mediare, Romanian media
medicina f. (Noun) "medicine"
13th cent. Old Spanish melezina. From Latin medicina 'id.,' derived from medicus "healing" (see médico).
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese medicina, Galician medicina, French médecine, Italian medicina, Romanian medicină
médico (Noun, Adjective) "doctor;" "medical"
Late 15th cent. From Latin medicus 'id.,' from mederi "to heal." From Proto-Italic *med-ē- "to heal," but originally "to measure healing." From Proto-Indo-European *med- "to measure."
In Spain, the title médica is considered disrespectful toward women and doctora is used in its stead.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian médicu, Portuguese médico, Catalan metge, Italian medico, Aromanian medicu, Romanian medic, Sardinian medicu
Celtic
Old Irish midithir "to measure," Middle Welsh meðu "to think," meddu "rule," Middle Cornish medhes "to say"
Germanic
Gothic mitan "to measure," Old Norse meta "to evaluate," Old High German mezzan "to measure," Old English metan 'id.' (English to measure)
Hellenic
Ancient Greek μέδομαι (médomai) "to care for"
Armenian
Armenian mit-kʿ "mind"
Indo-Iranian
Young Avestan vī-māδaiiaṇta "they must measure"
medio m. (Noun, Adjective) "half;" "average;" "environment;" "middle"
12th cent. restoration from Latin medius "middle." The native word in Old Spanish was meyo but was replaced during the Middle Ages. From Proto-Italic *meþio 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *medhi̯-o- 'id.' From an archaic stem *me- "middle." See also media.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian mediu, Portuguese médio, Catalan mig, French mi-, Italian medio, Eastern Vulgar Latin:njedz, Romanian mediu, Sardinian mesu
Celtic
Gaulish medio- "mid-," Old Irish mid- 'id.'
Germanic
Gothic midjis "middle," Old Norse miðr 'id.,' Old High German mitti 'id.' Old Saxon middi, Old English midde 'id.' (English mid-)
Balto-Slavic
Old Church Slavonic meždaxъ "alleys," Russian mežá "boundary," Czech meze 'id.,' Polish miedza "border," Slovene méja "grove," Old Prussian median "wood," Lithuanian mẽdžias "forest," Latvian mežs "wood"
Hellenic
Ancient Greek μέσος (mésos) "middle"
Armenian
Armenian mēǰ "middle"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit mádhya- "middle," Old Avestan maidiia- 'id.'
medir (Verb) "to measure"
12th cent. From Latin metiri 'id.' From Proto-Italic *mēti- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *meh1-ti̯- 'id.' From the root *meh1- 'id.'
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese medir, Sardinian medire
Celtic
Old Irish midithir "to measure," Middle Welsh meðu "to think," meddu "rule," Middle Cornish medhes "to say"
Germanic
Gothic mitan "to measure," Old Norse meta "to evaluate," Old High German mezzan "to measure," Old English metan 'id.' (English to measure)
Hellenic
Ancient Greek μέδομαι (médomai) "to care for"
Armenian
Armenian mit-kʿ "mind"
Indo-Iranian
Young Avestan vī-māδaiiaṇta "they must measure"
"In historical times the root *med- designated a great variety of different things: “govern,” “think,” “care for,” “measure.” ... It can be defined as “measure”—not “measurement,” but “moderation” (Lat. modus, modestus)." ~ E. Benveniste, Indo-European Language and Society (1973)
medusa f. (Noun) "medusa," "jellyfish"
C. 1899. From Latin Medusa, a Gorgon capable of turning men to stone if they looked upon her (see Medusa). The modern meaning of medusa is a metaphor for the tentacles of a jellyfish resembling the snakes she wears upon her head.
Medusa f. (Noun) "Medusa"
From Latin Medusa, a Gorgon capable of turning men to stone if they looked upon her. Borrowed from Ancient Greek Μέδουσα (Médousa) "Medusa," but lit. "ruling." From μέδειν (médein) "to govern." From Proto-Indo-European *med- "to measure," from an earlier root *meh1- of the same meaning (see medir).
Indo-European
Celtic
Old Irish midithir "to measure," Middle Welsh meðu "to think," meddu "rule," Middle Cornish medhes "to say"
Germanic
Gothic mitan "to measure," Old Norse meta "to evaluate," Old High German mezzan "to measure," Old English metan 'id.' (English to measure)
Hellenic
Ancient Greek μέδομαι (médomai) "to care for"
Armenian
Armenian mit-kʿ "mind"
Indo-Iranian
Young Avestan vī-māδaiiaṇta "they must measure"
mejor (Adveb) "better"
12th cent. From Latin melior 'id.' From Proto-Italic *meliōs. Of unclear etymology.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian meyor, Portuguese melhor, Galician mellor, Catalan millor, French meilleur, Italian migliore, Sardinian megnus
Balto-Slavic
Latvian milns "very"
Hellenic
Ancient Greek μάλα (mála) "very," μᾶλλον (mâllon) "more," "rather"