The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
mora (1) f. (Noun) "delay"
16th cent. From Latin mora 'id.' From Proto-Italic *morH-ā- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *morh2- 'id.'
Indo-European
Celtic
Old Irish mair "lasts"
Hellenic
Ancient Greek μωρός (morós) "dull, stupid"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit mūrá "dull," "stupid"
mora (2) f. (Noun) "blackberry"
Late 15th cent., although derivations of mora date back as far as the 11th cent. From Vulgar Latin *mura 'id.,' from Latin mora "blackberries," the plural of morum "blackberry." Borrowed from Ancient Greek μόρον (móron) "blackberry," "mulberry." Traditionally assumed to be from Proto-Indo-European *mor- or *mur- "blackberry," "mulberry," "ripened dark berry," but the interior vowel -o- posited by Pokorny (1959) and Mallory & Adams (1997) is specious at best. The inability to reconstruct the vowel with any reliability has led to as many theories as there are theorists; the best theories are that morum was borrowed from Ancient Greek or that the lack of agreement over the vowel shows that *mVr- was borrowed from another language (Martirosyan 2015). Note below the similar words in other language families that hint that the word for blackberries was shared, a word probably spread throughout the region via trade.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian mora, Catalan móra, Romanian mură, Sardinian mura
Celtic
Old Irish smér "blackberry," Middle Welsh merwydden "mulberry"
Hellenic
Ancient Greek μόρον (móron) "blackberry"
Armenian
Armenian mor "blackberry"
Uralic
Sami
Lule muor'jē "berry," Kildin mūrj 'id.'
Finnic
Finnish marja "berry," Estonian mari 'id.'
Mordvinic
Esya maŕ "berry"
Mari
Mari (dialects) mör "berry"
Mansi
Mansi moåri "berry cluster"
Khanty
Khanty (Traub) murǝp "berry cluster"
Northeast Caucasian
Nakh
Chechen mürg "guelder rose"
Lezgic
Lezgi mere "blackberry"
Dargwa
Chiragh mimre "raspberry"
Lak
Lak: mamari "blackberry"
Lezghian
Tabasaran mer-er "blackberry"
morada f. (Noun) "dwelling;" "sojourn"
12th cent. From morar.
morado m. (Noun, Adjective) "purple"
15th cent. From Medieval Latin moratum 'id.' Derived from Latin morum "blackberry" by way of the berry's color (see mora (2)).
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian moráu, Galician morado, Catalan morat
morar (Verb) "to reside"
12th cent. From Latin morari "to remain," from mora "delay" (see mora (1)).
morder (Verb) "to bite"
13th cent. Borrowed from Latin mordere 'id.' From Proto-Italic *mord-eje- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *(s)mord-ei̯e- 'id.' Possibly from an ancient root *(s)mer- 'id.'
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese morder, French mordre, Italian mordere
Germanic
Old High German smerzen "to hurt," Old English smeortan 'id.'
Hellenic
Ancient Greek σμερδνός (smerdnós) "terrible"
Armenian
Armenian mart "battle"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit mr̥ditá- "crushed," Old Avestan mōrəṇdat̃ "he ruins"
morir (Verb) "to die"
11th cent. From Vulgar Latin *morire, from Latin mori 'id.' From Proto-Italic *mor-je/o- 'id.' From late Proto-Indo-European *mr̥-i̯e/o- 'id.' From an ancient root *mer- "to disappear," applied euphemistically. A primary i̯e/o-present.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian morrer, Galician morreo, Catalan morir, French mourir, Italian morire, Aromanian mor, Romanian muri, Sardinian morrere
Balto-Slavic
Old Church Slavonic mrěti "to die," Lithuanian mir̃ti 'id.'
Armenian
Armenian meṙani- "to die"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit mriyáte "to die," Young Avestan miriia- 'id.'
mostrar (Verb) "to show"
13th cent. From Vulgar Latin *mostrare 'id.' From Latin monstrare 'id.' From monstrum "monster," but originally "warning" (see monstruo).
Variants
14th cent. Old Spanish mossar
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian mostrar, Portuguese mostrar, Galician amosar, Catalan mostrar, French montrer, Italian mostrare, Romanian mustra, Sardinian mostrare
Following the Dictionnaire Étymologique Roman, the rare Old Spanish variant mossar and Galician amosar reflect Vulgar Latin *mossare.
mostrar (Verb) to show
12th cent. From Latin monstrare 'id.,' from monstrum "prodigy," "monster" (see monstruo).
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese mostrar, Galician amosar, Catalan mostrar, French montrer, Italian mostrare, Romanian mustra, Sardinian mustrare
motivo m. (Noun) "motive"
15th cent. Borrowed from Late Latin motivus "moved." From movere "to move" (see mover).