The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
(Pronoun) "me"
12th cent. From Vulgar Latin mi, from Latin mihi 'id.' From Proto-Italic *meχei 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *h1meǵhi̯o 'id.'
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese me, Galician me, Catalan mi, Italian mi, Romanian mie
miedo m. (Noun) "fear"
12th cent. From Latin metus 'id.' From Proto-Italic *met-u 'id.' Of unknown origin, possibly borrowed from a non-Indo-European language.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian mieu, Portuguese medo, Galician medo
Celtic
Old Irish moth (?) "astonishment"
miembro m. (Noun) "member"
13th cent. From Latin membrum 'id.' From Proto-Italic *memsro- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *mēms-ro- "member (of the body)." From the root *mēs- "meat."
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian miembru, Portuguese membro, Catalan membre, French membre, Italian membro, Romanian membru
Celtic
Old Irish mír "portion (of meat)"
Germanic
Gothic mimz "meat"
Albanian
Albanian mish "meat"
Balto-Slavic
Old Church Slavonic męso "meat," Russian mjáso 'id.,' Czech maso 'id.,' Polish mięso 'id.,' Slovene mesọ̑ 'id.,' Old Prussian mensā 'id.,' Lithuanian mėsà 'id.,' Latvian mìesa 'id.'
Hellenic
Ancient Greek μῆρα (mêra) "thigh bones," "body parts"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit māṃsá- "meat," Young Avestan mā̊ŋhəm 'id.'
Tocharian
B mīsa "meat"
miente f. (Noun) (obsolete) "thought;" "will"
10th cent. Old Spanish miente. From Latin mentem, accusative of mens "mind." See mente.
-miente (archaic) Adverb-forming suffix akin to "-ly."
Early 13th cent. Old Spanish -mientre, under contamination from -iter, and -miente. All but entirely replaced by -mente, which was originally a dialect variant. From Vulgar Latin *-mente.
"In modern Spanish, -mente is no longer perceived as a noun (its congener miente is now confined to a few idiomatic expressions), but it can still be detached from its host adjective in order to avoid awkward repetition.... ~ Harris & Vincent, The Romance Languages (2003)
-miento Noun-forming suffix from verbs.
From Latin -mentum 'id.' From Proto-Italic *-mn̥to-. Created by interpreting the feminine singular *-mn̥ta- as a neuter plural and forming a new neuter singular form *-mn̥to- by analogy.
mientras (Adverb) "meanwhile"
19th cent. From Old Spanish demientras 'id.,' earlier domienter (10th cent.); although mientra appeared as a rare textual variant as early as the 12th cent. From Latin dum "while" and interim "while" (see ínterin).
Indo-European
Romance
Italian mentre
Other old Romance languages show variation with de-. Probably dropped in confusion with de "of."
mierda f. (Noun) "excrement," (vulgar) "shit"
15th cent. From Latin merda 'id.' From either *merd-ā- or *smerd-ā- 'id' in Proto-Italic. From Proto-Indo-European *smerd-h2- "excrement," but more exactly "that which smells." The prehistoric date of the loss of s-initial is unknown. From the root *smer- "to smell," "to stink."
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian mierda, Portuguese merda, Galician merda, Catalan merda, French merde, Italian merda, Romanian dezmierda, Sardinian merda
Balto-Slavic
Old Church Slavonic smradъ "stench," Russian smórod "smell," Czech smrad 'id.,' Polish smród 'id.,' Slovene smrȃd 'id.,' Lithuanian smirdė́ti "to stink," Latvian smar̂ds "smell"
mil m. (Cardinal Number) "thousand"
12th cent. Old Spanish mill. From Latin mille 'id.' From Proto-Italic *smīχeslī 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *sm-i̯h2hes-l-i̯h2 'id.' From *sem- "one" and *ǵhes-lo- "great quantity" or "thousand."
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese mil, Galician mil, Catalan mil, French mille, Italian mille, Aromanian njilje, Romanian milli, Sardinian mila
Hellenic
Ancient Greek χῑ́λιοι (khílioi) "thousand"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit sahásra- "having one thousand," Avestan hazaŋra- 'id.'
militar (1) (Adjective, Noun) "military;" (m.) "soldier," (f.) "soldier's wife"
15th cent. An adjectival from Latin militaris "military." From miles "soldier." Of unknown origin.
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese militar, French militaire, Italian militare, Romanian militar