The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
libra f. (Noun) "pound"
13th cent. From Latin libra "pound," "balance." The meaning of a pound is probably the original sense of the word. From Proto-Italic *leiþra- "pound," and perhaps "coin." Of unknown origin. Probably borrowed from another language.
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese libra, Galician libra, French livre, Italian libra, livră
Hellenic
Ancient Greek λίτρα (lítra) "Sicilian coin equivalent to 50 drachmes," "pound." As the Proto-Hellenic form was *līþrā, it looks like the word was borrowed from Proto-Italic *leiþra-, however, one could just as easily assume both *līþrā and *leiþra- were borrowed from a source language spoken in Sicily.
libre (Adjective) "free"
Early 13th cent. From Latin liber 'id.' From Proto-Italic *leuþ-ero- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *h1leu̯dh-ero- "free" but literally "one of the people" in the sense that the people are assumed to be free, unenslaved individuals. From the root noun *h1leu̯dh- "people," taken directly from an older root verb *h1leu̯dh- "to grow."
Indo-European
Italic
Oscan lúvfreis "of the freeman," Paelignian loufir "freeman," Faliscan loferta "freewoman," Venetic louderobos "for the children"
Germanic
Old Norse lýðr "people," Old High German liut 'id.,' Old Saxon liud 'id.' Old English lēod (English lede)
Balto-Slavic
Old Church Slavonic ljudьje "people," Russian ljúdi 'id.,' Polish ludzie, Slovene ljudję̑ 'id.,' Lithuanian liáudis "lower people," Latvian ļaudis 'id.'
Hellenic
Ancient Greek ἐλεύθερος (eleytheros) "free"
libro m. (Noun) "book"
12th cent. From Latin librum, accusative of liber "book," but originally "tree bark." From Proto-Italic *lufro- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *lu̯bh-ro- "leaf." From *leu̯bh- "to peel."
Indo-European
Celtic
Old Irish luib "herb," Middle Welsh luibh 'id.,' Old Breton -lub 'id.,' Cornish lowarth "garden"
Germanic
Gothic lubja-leis "witchcraft," laub "leaf," Old Norse lýf "medicinal herbs," lauf "leaf," Old High German loub "leaf," Old Saxon lōf 'id.,' Old English lēaf (English leaf), lybb "poison"
Albanian
Albanian labë "rind"
Balto-Slavic
Russian lob "forehead," Czech leb "skull," Old Prussian lubbo "plank," Lithuanian lubà 'id.,' Latvian luba 'id.'
Basque
Basque liburu "book," borrowed from from Latin
licuar (Verb) "to liquefy"
17th cent. From Latin liquare 'id.' From Proto-Italic *(w)leikw-e/o- "to make liquid." From Proto-Indo-European *u̯lei̯kw- "to make moist," "to wet." See also líquido.
Indo-European
Romance
Italian liquare
líder m. (Noun) "leader"
Borrowed from English leader. Old English lǣdere 'id.' From the verb lēad "to lead." From Proto-Germanic *laidjan- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *loi̯t-ei̯e- 'id.,' an ablaut derivation of *lei̯t- "to pass."
Indo-European
Italic
Latin litus "coast"
Germanic
Old Norse leiða, Old High German leiten, Old Saxon lēdian, Old English lǣdan (English to lead)
Hellenic
Ancient Greek λοίτη (loíte) "tomb"
Indo-Iranian
Young Avestan iriϑiieiti "to die"
Tocharian
A litā- "to pass on," B litā- 'id.'
lígula f. (Noun) "ligule"
16th cent. From Latin ligula "spoon," from earlier lingula "spoon" but literally "small tongue." From lingua "tongue" (see lengua).
Indo-European
Romance
Italian lingula, Aromanian lingurã, Romanian lingură
limpio (Adjective) "clean"
12th cent. A borrowing from Late Latin limpidus "clean," but originally "clear." Probably originally referring to liquids and waters, in which case this maybe a borrowing from Sabellic *limp- "liquid" (Solta 1967). From an earlier Sabellic verb *limp-ē "to be liquid," derived from Proto-Italic *linkw-ē- "to leave." From Proto-Indo-European *li̯-n-kw-ē- 'id.' A nasal-present from a root *u̯lei̯kw- "to wet."
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian llimpiu, Portuguese límpido, French limpide, Italian limpido, Aromanian limpid, Romanian limpede, Sardinian limpidu
lindo (Adjective) "cute," "pretty"
13th cent. Old Spanish lindo meant "pure," "good." Possibly from Latin legitimus "legitimate" through *lidmo (legitimus > *leitimo > *liidimo; cf. Old Portuguese liidimo "legal"). Legitus derives from Latin lex "law" (see ley).
Indo-European
Romance
Old Portuguese liidimo "legal"
línea f. (Noun) "line"
13th cent. Old Spanish liña. From Latin linea 'id.,' literally "line of thread." From lineus "flaxen," from linum "flax." From Proto-Italic *līno- 'id.' The variation between *lino- and *linto- means this is probably a loanword from a non-Indo-European language.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian llinia, Portuguese linha, Catalan línia, French ligne, Italian linea, Romanian linie
Italic
Latin linteum "cloth," "sail," linteō "weaver" (< Proto-Italic *linto)
Balto-Slavic
Old Prussian lynno "flax," Lithuanian lìnas 'id.,' Latvian lini 'id.," lьnъ "flax," Russian lën "flax," Czech len "flax," Polish len 'id.,' Slovene lȃn "flax"
Hellenic
Ancient Greek λίνον (línon) "linen," Mycenaean ri-no 'id.'
"[An Indo-European] word for 'flax' (*linom) is confined to ... northwest Europe (Celtic, Italic, Baltic, Slavic, possibly Germanic) and Greece. Flax (Linum usitatissimum) was domesticated quite early in southwest Asia and is found on Neolithic sites at least from central and northern as well as southern Europe but is not recorded until quite late in the regions north of the Black Sea." ~ Mallory & Adams, Encyclopedia of Indo-European Culture (1997)
liquidación f. (Noun) "liquidation"
From liquidar.