The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
leer (Verb) "to read"
12th cent. From Latin legere "to read," "to gather." From Proto-Italic *leg-e/o- "to gather." From Proto-Indo-European *leǵ-e/o- 'id.'
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian lleer, Portuguese ler, Galician ler, Catalan llegir, French lire, Italian leggere, Sardinian lègere
Italic
Paelignian lexe "you read," Marrucinian leexe 'id.'
Albanian
Albanian mb-ledh "to collect"
Hellenic
Ancient Greek λέγειν (légein) "to reckon"
legra f. (Noun) (med.) "rounded scalpel"
13th cent. Probably from Latin ligula "spoon" (see lígula).
Indo-European
Romance
Italian lingula, Aromanian lingurã, Romanian lingură
legrar (Verb) (med.) "to scrape the fibrous membrane of a bone;" "to scrape the lining of a uterus"
16th cent. From legra.
lejos (Adjective) "far"
13th cent. From Latin laxius "wider," "looser," from laxus "wide." See laja for continued etymology.
Indo-European
Romance
Italian lasso, Romanian lax
lengua f. (Noun) "tongue;" "language"
12th cent. From Latin lingua 'id.' Old Latin dingua. The change from d- to l- was a taboo distortion and from contamination from lingere "to lick." From Proto-Italic *dn̥χwā- "tongue." From Proto-Indo-European *dnǵh-u̯h2- 'id.'
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian llingua, Portuguese língua, Galician lingua, Catalan llengua, French langue, Italian lingua, Aromanian limbã, Romanian limbã, Sardinianlimba
Italic
Oscan fancua "tongues"
Celtic
Old Irish tengae "tongue," Old Welsh tauawt 'id.,' Middle Breton teaut 'id.,' Old Cornish tauot 'id.'
Germanic
Gothic tuggo "tongue," Old Norse tunga 'id.,' Old High German zunga 'id.,' Old Saxon tunga, Old English tunge (English tongue)
Balto-Slavic
Old Church Slavonic językъ "tongue," Russian jazýk 'id.,' Old Prussian insuwis 'id.,' Lithuanian liežuvìs 'id.,
Armenian
Armenian lezow "tongue"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit jihvā- "tongue," Avestan hizuuā- 'id.'
Tocharian
A käntu "tongue," B kantwo 'id.'
lesión f. (Noun) "lesion"
13th cent. Old Spanish lisión. From Late Latin læsionem, accusative of læsio 'id.' From the verb lædere "to hurt." Of unknown origin. Some have connected the word with Ancient Greek λίστρον (lístron) "spade."
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese lesão, Catalan lesió, French lésion, Italian lesione, Romanian leziune
lesivo (Adjective) "harmful"
From lesión.
leve (Adjective) (weight) "light"
15th cent. From Latin levis 'id.' From Proto-Italic *leχu- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *h1legwh-u̯- 'id.' From the root *h1legwh- "to be spry."
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese leve, Catalan lleu, French liège, Italian lieve
Celtic
Old Irish laigiu "lighter," Middle Welsh llaw "small," Old Breton lau 'id.'
Germanic
Gothic leihts "light," Old Norse léttr 'id.,' Old High German līht 'id.,' Old English līht (English light)
Albanian
Albanian lehtë "light
Balto-Slavic
Old Church Slavonic lьgъkъ "light," Russian lëgkij 'id.,' Slovene lagȃk 'id.,' Lithuanian leñgvas 'id.
Hellenic
Ancient Greek ἐλαχύς (elakhys) "small"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit raghú- "fast," Young Avestan rəuuī- 'id.'
Tocharian
B laṅkutse "light"
ley f. (Noun) "law"
12th cent. From Latin legem 'id.' accusative form of lex. From Proto-Italic *lēg- 'id.' Of uncertain origin.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian llei, Portuguese lei, Galician lei, Catalan llei, French loi, Italian legge, Aromanian leadzi, Romanian lege
Italic
Oscan ligus "by the law," Marrucinian lixs "law"
Basque
Basque lege "law," borrowed from Latin legem
libertad f. (Noun) "liberty"
13th cent. From libertas 'id.,' from liber "free" and -tas (see libre and -tad respectively).
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese liberdade, Galician liberdade, Catalan llibretat, French liberté, Italian libertà, Romanian libertate
"Although the opposition “free/slave” is common to all Indo-European peoples, a common designation of the notion of “liberty” is unknown." ~ E. Benveniste, Indo-European Language and Society (1973)