The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
lamento m. (Noun) "lament," "wail"
16th cent. From Latin lamentum "lament." From Proto-Italic *lāmnto- "howl." From Proto-Indo-European *leh2-mn̥-to- 'id.' From the root *leh2- "to howl."
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese lamento
Italic
Latin latrare "to bark" (< *leh2-tro- "barking")
Germanic
Gothic lailoun "the scolded"
Balto-Slavic
Old Church Slavonic lajati "to scold," Russian lájat' "to bark," Polish łajać 'id.,' Slovene lȃjati 'id.,' Lithuanian lóti 'id.'
Armenian
Armenian "to wail"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit rā́yati "to bark," Young Avestan -raiiaṇt- "shouting"
lana f. (Noun) "wool"
13th cent. From Latin lana 'id.' From Proto-Italic *wlānā- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *h2u̯lh1-neh2- "wool," literally "pluckings." From the root *h2u̯elh1- "to pluck."
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian llana, Portuguese la, Galician la, Catalan llana, French laine, Italian lana, Aromanian lãnã, Romanian lână, Sardinian lana
Italic
Latin vellus "fleece" (< *Hu̯elh1-no-)
Celtic
Middle Irish olann "wool," Old Welsh gulan 'id.,' Middle Breton glan 'id.,' Old Cornish gluan 'id.'
Germanic
Gothic wulla 'id.,' Old Norse ull 'id.,' Old High German wolla 'id.,' Old English wull (English wool)
Balto-Slavic
Old Church Slavonic vlьna 'id.,' Russian vólna, Old Prussian wilna "skirt," Lithuanian vìlna "wool," Latvian vil̃na 'id.'
Hellenic
Ancient Greek λῆνος (lênos) "wool"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit ū́rṇā- "wool," Avestan varənā- 'id.'
lardo m. (Noun) "animal fat;" "lard"
From Latin lardum "lard," a syncope of earlier laridum. Probably borrowed from Ancient Greek λαρινός (larinos) "fat" - though the change from -n- in Greek to -d- is odd - which was derived from λαρός (laros) "pleasing," "sweet." Of unknown origin. Perhaps borrowed from another language.
The feminine larda, meaning "animal fat" but not "lard," is derived from lardo.
larga f. (Noun) "dilation;" "pool cue;" "instrument to lengthen shoes"
All feminized nominal derivations of the adjective largo.
Also the origin of the surnames Largo, Larga, Largacha and Largoza.
largar (Verb) "to release;" "to slacken"
15th cent. From largo.
largo (Adjective) "long"
12th cent. From Latin largus 'id.' Of unknown origin.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian llargu, Portuguese largo, Galician largo, Catalan llarg, French large, Italian largo, Aromanian largu, Romanian larg, Sardinian lalgu
lástima f. (Noun) "pity"
16th cent. From Vulgar Latin *blastema "lament," "hurt," but originally "blasphemy;" from *blastemare "to blaspheme" (see lastimar).
lastimar (Verb) "to hurt"
Late 15th cent. From Vulgar Latin *blastemare "to injure," but originally "to blaspheme." The sense evolution is from a blasphemy to a curse; later a curse intended to harm, then to the harm itself. From Latin blasphemare "to blaspheme." The word was re-introduced in Spanish as blasfemar.
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese lastimar, Galician , Catalan blasmar, French blâmer, Italian bestemmiare, Aromanian blastim, Romanian blestema, Sardinian fraltimare
lata f. (Noun) "can," "tin can;" "annoyance"
In the modern sense of "can," first attested in the 18th cent. But since the 15th cent. meaning "stick" or "strip of wood;" the latter meaning gradually evolving into "strip of tin" and then into its modern meanings. From Vulgar Latin *latta "lath," "stick." Either borrowed from Proto-West-Germanic *lattō- "board," "slat" or both *latta and *lattō- were borrowed from the same source. Ultimately from an unknown language.
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese lata, Galician lata, Catalan llata, French latte, Italian latta
Germanic
Old English lætt, Frisian latte, Middle Dutch latte, Old High German lazza, latta
latido m. (Noun) "heart beat;" "painful throbbing sensation;" "yelp (of a dog)"
14th cent. From latir.