The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
in- (1), im- A negation prefix indicating "not" or "against."
From Latin in- 'id.' From Proto-Italic *in- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *n̥- 'id.'
Indo-European
Italic
Oscan an-, Umbrian a-
Celtic
Old Irish in-, Old Welsh an-, Old Breton an-, Old Cornish an-
Germanic
Gothic un-, Old Norse ó-, Old High German un-, Old Saxon un-, Old English un- (English un-)
Hellenic
Ancient Greek ἀν- (án-)
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit an-, Avestan a-
Tocharian
A an-, B an-
in- (2), en- Prefix "in," "into"
A prefix grammaticized from the Latin preposition in 'id.' See en.
Indo-European
Italic
Oscan en, Paelignian i
Celtic
Old Irish i, Old Welsh in, Old Breton en, Cornish yn
Germanic
Gothic in, Old Norse í, Old Saxon in, Old High German in, Old English in (English in)
Balto-Slavic
Old Church Slavonic vъn, Russian vo, Lithuanian į, Old Prussian en
Hellenic
Ancient Greek ἐν (en)
Armenian
Armenian i
Tocharian
A yn-, B in-
Also im- (e.g. importar) which occurs in words borrowed from Latin, rather than natively inherited.
incluso (Adjective, Adverb) "enclosed;" "including"
From Latin inclusus 'id.,' the past participle of includere "to enclose." From in- and claudere "to close" (see en- and clausurar).
increíble (Adjective) "incredible"
From in- "not" and creíble "believable."
inducción f. (Noun) "induction"
C. 1330. From Latin inductionem, accusative of inductio 'id.' From the verb inducere "to induce" (see inducir).
inducir (Verb) "to induce"
14th cent. Old Spanish enducir. From Latin inducere 'id.' From in- (2) and ducere "to lead." From Proto-Italic *douk-e- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *deu̯k-e/o- "to pull." See also dogo (2).
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese induzir, French enduire, Italian indurre, Romanian induce
Celtic
Middle Welsh dwyn "to take to," "to steal"
Germanic
Gothic tiuhan "to lead," "to pull," Old High German ziohan 'id.,' Old Saxon tiohan 'id.,' Old English tēon 'id.' (English tee)
Albanian
Albanian nduk "to draw out"
infierno m. (Noun) "hell;" "inferno"
12th cent. From Latin infernus 'id.,' but originally "of the lower region," from inferus "low." From Proto-Italic *enþero- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *n̥dher-o- 'id.' From *n̥dhér- "under."
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian infiernu, Portuguese inferno, Galician inferno, Catalan infern, French enfer, Italian inferno, Romanian infern, Sardinian iferru
Italic
Faliscan ifra "beneath"
Celtic
Gaulish anderon "of the gods of the underworld"
Germanic
Gothic undar "under," Old Norse undir 'id.,' Old High German untar "below," Old Saxon undar "under," Old English under
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit ádhara- "lower," Young Avestan aδara- 'id.'
información f. (Noun) "information"
14th cent. From Latin informatio "formation;" "education" from informare "to inform" (see informar).
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese informação, Galician información, Catalan informació, Italian informazione, nformație
informar (Verb) "to inform"
15th cent. From Latin informare 'id.,' from in- (see en-) and formare "to form" (see formar).
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese informar, French informer, Italian informare
Inglaterra f. (Noun) "England"
From inglés and -terra "earth."