The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
-ía Feminine noun-forming prefix.
From Latin -ia 'id.' From Proto-Italic *-ia 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *-i̯h2 'id.' The ending *-h2 originally functioned by creating collective nouns, see -a.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian -ariu, Portuguese -ia, Galician -ía, Catalan -ia, French -ie, Italian -ia, Romanian -ie
Hellenic
Ancient Greek -ία (-ía)
-ico Adjective-forming suffix
From Latin -icus 'id.' From Proto-Italic *-īko-, a decausative suffix deriving from the instrumental suffix in Proto-Indo-European *-i̯h1-ko-.
An uncommon variant -eco reflects i ~ e confusion in Vulgar Latin in Iberia.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian -icu, Portuguese -ico, Galician -ico, Catalan -ic, French -ique, Italian -ico, Aromanian -ic
Balto-Slavic
Old Church Slavonic -ъkъ
Hellenic
Ancient Greek -ικός (ikós)
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit -śas
idea f. (Noun) "idea"
15th cent. From Latin idea 'id.,' from Greek ἰδέα (idéa) "appearance," "form." From Proto-Indo-European *u̯ei̯d- "to see," "to know." See also ver.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian idea, Portuguese ideia, Catalan idea, French idée, Italian idea, Romanian idee
idiota (Adjective, Noun) "idiotic;" "idiot"
13th cent. From Latin idiota 'id.,' borrowed from Greek ἰδιώτης (idiótes) "uneducated person," "commoner." From ἴδιος (ídios) "private." From Proto-Indo-European *su̯o-i̯o- "ourself." Developed from the reflexive pronoun *su̯e- (see se (1)).
-ido Adjective-forming suffix indicating a tendency.
A 13th cent. learned borrowing from Latin -idus 'id.' From Proto-Italic *-idos 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *-i̯-dho- 'id.' An i-stem adjective to form an adjective from verbs.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian -íu, Portuguese -ido, French -ide, Italian -ido, Romanian -ed
"Few Romance dialects display denominal adjectives which formally or semantically correspond to the Spanish -ido.... In genetic terms, -ido here is not a derivational suffix but rather a true participle marker. After the demise of [a] source verb in -ir, speakers would have no trouble in peeling off -ido as a recognizable morpheme." ~ S. N. Dworkin, Etymology and Derivational Morphology: The Genesis of Old Spanish Denominal Adjectives in -ido (1985)
-igar Suffix indicating action or doing.
From Latin agere "to do," "to drive." From Proto-Italic *ag-e/o- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *h2eǵ-e/o- 'id.' A thematic present.
Indo-European
Italic
Oscan acum "to act," Marrucinian agine "through the act"
Celtic
Old Irish aig "to drive," Old Welsh hegit "goes"
Germanic
Old Icelandic aka "to drive"
Hellenic
Ancient Greek ἄγ- (ág) "to drive"
Armenian
Armenian acem 'id.'
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit ájati "drives," Young Avestan azaiti 'id.'
Tocharian
A āk- "to lead," B āk- 'id.'
iglesia f. (Noun) "church"
10th cent. From Vulgar Latin eclesia 'id.,' from Latin ecclesia "assembly." Borrowed from Greek ἐκκλησία (ekklesía) "assembly" (more literally "those called out") composed of ἐκ (ek) "out" and κᾰλεῖν (kaleîn) "to call."
Also the origin of the surnames de la Iglesia, Igreja, Igrejas, Iglesias, Esclesies, and Laiglesia.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian eglesia, Portuguese igreja, Galician igrexa, Catalan església, French église, Italian chiese, Sardinian chegia
Basque
Basque eliza "church" (borrowed from Vulgar Latin)
Greek ἐκ (ek) "out" is cognate to Latin ex (Spanish ex) and κᾰλεῖν (kaleîn) "to call" is cognate to Latin clamare "to call" (Spanish llamar). Thus, the Greek word ἐκκλησία "assembly" has a direct twin in Latin exclamare "to exclaim" (Spanish exclamar).
ignorar (Verb) "to ignore"
15th cent. Borrowed from Latin ignorare "to not know." From Proto-Italic *en-gnōs-e/o- 'id.' From *en-, a negation prefix (see in-), and *gnōs-e/o- "to know." From Proto-Indo-European *ǵneh3-s- 'id.'
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian inorar, Portuguese ignorar, Catalan ignorar, French ignorer, Italian ignorare, Romanian ignora
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit jānati "he recognizes"
Tocharian
A kñasäṣt "you recognize"
igual (Adjective) "equal"
Very early 12th cent. Old Spanish egual. From Latin æqualis 'id.,' composed of æquus "equal" and -alis, an adjective-forming suffix indicating a relationship (see -al (2)). Latin æquus is of unknown origin.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian igual, Portuguese igual, Galician igual, Catalan igual, French égal, Italian uguale, Romanian egal, Sardinian aguale
-il Adjective-forming suffix indicating a relation.
From Latin -ilis. From Proto-Italic *-īlis 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *-i̯h2-li̯- 'id.' An i-stem with an adjectival extension.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian -il, Portuguese -il, Galician -il, Catalan -il, French -ile, Italian -ile, Aromanian -ilji, Romanian -il