The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
hogar m. (Noun) "home;" "hearth"
The sense of hearth is original. From Vulgar Latin *focaris 'id.,' from Latin focus "fire" (see fuego).
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese fogo, Galician fogo, Catalan foc, French feu, Italian fuoco, Aromanian foc, Romanian foc, Sardinian fogu
hoja f. (Noun) "page," "sheet of paper"
Old Spanish foja. From Latin folia "leaves." Originally a neuter plural noun (sing. folium) but reanalyzed as a feminine singular on the basis of the -a ending. From Proto-Italic *folio- "leaf." From Proto-Indo-European *dholH-i̯o- 'id.'
Also the origin of the surnames Hojo, Hojas, Hojeda, and Hojedo.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian fueya, Portuguese folha, Galician folla, Catalan fulla, French feuille, Italian foglia, Aromanian foalji, Romanian foaie, Sardinian fógiu
Celtic
Gaulish pempe-doula "Pontentilla" (lit. 'five-leaves'), Middle Irish duilne "leaf," Middle Welsh deil "foliage," Old Breton dol "leaves," Old Cornish delen "leaf"
Germanic
Old English dile "dill" (English dill)
Albanian
Albanian dal "I emerge"
Hellenic
Ancient Greek θάλος (thálos) "sprout"
Armenian
Armenian dalar "green"
hola (Interjection) "hello"
16th cent. Probably from French holà "stop there," a compound of ho "stop" and "there."
hollar (Verb) "to tread"
13th cent. From Vulgar Latin *fullare "to full cloth," derived from the noun fullo "fuller." Of unknown origin.
hombre m. (Noun) "man"
10th cent. Old Spanish omre, earlier omne. From Latin hominem, the accusative of homo 'id.' (Archaic Latin hemo). From Proto-Italic *χem-ō 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *dhǵem-ōn "human," but more literally "one of the earth." From *dheǵ-ōm- "earth" (see humus (1)).
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian home, Portuguese homem, Galician home, Catalan home, French homme, Italian uomo, Aromanian om, Romanian om, Sardinian ómine
Italic
Oscan humuns "men," Umbrian homonus "to the men"
Celtic
Old Irish duine "man," Welsh dyn 'id.,' Breton den 'id.,' Cornish den 'id.'
Germanic
Gothic guma "man," Old Norse gumi 'id.,' Old High German gomo 'id.,' Old Saxon gumo Old English guma 'id.' (English (matrimony) groom
Balto-Slavic
Old Prussian smunents "man," Lithuanian žmogùs 'id.'
The evolution of -mn- to -mr- to -mbr- is normal in Spanish (see hambre).
The North-West Indo-Europeans drew a special metaphor between the divine, among the stars, and the human, among the earth. Nowhere is this metaphor more plain than in the etymology of the word hombre. "[The Indo-European idea of the gods as ] ‘luminous’ and ‘celestial’; this is the quality which marks the god off from human beings, who are “terrestrial” (such is the meaning of the Latin word for “man,” homo)." ~ E. Benveniste, Indo-European Language and Society (1973)
homo- Prefix same
18th cent. From Ancient Greek ὁμός (homós) "same," "common." From late Proto-Indo-European *somh2-o- "same." From earlier *sem- "one" (the origin of the words siempre and mil).
Indo-European
Germanic
Gothic sama "same," Old Norse samr 'id.,' Old High German samo 'id.,' Old Saxon sama 'id.,' Old English sama 'id.' (English same)
Balto-Slavic
Old Church Slavonic samъ "self," Russian sámyj 'id.,' Polish sam< "alone," "myself"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit samá- "same," Old Persian hama 'id.'
homo (Adjective) homosexual
Apocapated form of homosexual.
homosexual m. (Adjective, Noun) homosexual
From homo- and sexual.
hondo (Adjective) "deep"
13th cent. Old Spanish fondo. From Latin fundus "bottom." From Proto-Italic *fundo- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *bhudh-men- 'id.'
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian fondu, Portuguese fundo, Catalan fons, French fond, Italian fondo, Aromanian afundu, Romanian fund, Sardinian fundhu
Celtic
Middle Irish bond "sole"
Germanic
Old Norse botn "bottom," Old High German bodam 'id.,' Old English botem (English bottom)
Hellenic
Ancient Greek πυθμήν (puthmén) "depth"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit budhná- "bottom," Avestan būna- 'id.'
Basque
Basque (h)ondo "bottom," borrowed from Spanish
honor m. (Noun) "honor"
10th cent. Old Spanish onor. From Latin honor 'id.' Of unknown origin.
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese honor, Galician honor, Catalan honor, French honneur, Italian onore, Romanian onoare, Sardinian onore