The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
-fono (Suffix) "sound"
Borrowed from Ancient Greek -φωνος ‎(-phonos) 'id.,' a suffix formed from φωνή ‎(phoné) 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *bhoh2-neh2 "voice," "sound." From earlier *bheh2- "say."
Indo-European
Germanic
Old Norse bǿn "question," English ben 'id.'
forma f. (Noun) "form"
13th cent. From Latin forma 'id.,' but then of disputed etymology. Perhaps borrowed from Etruscan *morma, itself borrowed from the word from Greek μόρφα (mórpha) "bodily form." Of unknown origin.
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese forma, Galician forma, French forme, Italian forma, Romanian formă
formar (Verb) "to form"
13th cent. From Latin formare 'id.,' a verb formed from forma.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian formar, Portuguese formar, French former, Italian formare
forzar (Verb) "to force"
10th cent. From Vulgar Latin *fortiare 'id.,' a verb formed from fortia (see fuerza).
foto f. (Noun) "photo"
A modern reduction of fotografía.
fotografía f. (Noun) "photography"
19th cent. neologism. From Greek φωτο- (photo) "light" and -γραφία (graphía) "writing" (see grafia). Greek φωτο (photo) is from Ancient Greek φάος (pháos) "light." From Proto-Indo-European *bheh2- "to shine."
Indo-European
Celtic
Old Irish bán "white"
Germanic
Norwegian bina "to stare," Middle High German büenen "to polish," Old English bōnian "to ornament"
Albanian
Gheg bâj "to make, Tosk bënj 'id.'
Armenian
Armenian banam "to reveal"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit bhā́ti "to shine," Avestan bānu- "splendor"
Tocharian
A pañi "splendor," B peñiyo 'id.'
fragua f. (Noun) "forge"
A very early 15th cent. metathesis of Old Spanish frauga, which dates back to the early 13th cent. From Vulgar Latin *faurga 'id.,' and that from Latin fabrica "workshop," taken from a prehistoric Italic phrase *ars fabrica "artisan work." For continued etymologies, see arte and fabro respectively.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian fragua, Portuguese frágua, Galician fragua, Catalan farga, Italian fabbro, Aromanian favru, Romanian faur, Sardinian frau
fraile m. (Noun) "friar"
12th cent. Old Spanish ffrayre, later fraile, friare. Borrowed from Old Occitan fraire "brother," from Latin frater. From Proto-Italic *frāter- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European*bhréh2-tr- 'id.'
Indo-European
Italic
Oscan fratrúm, Umbrian fratrum, Venetic hraterei
Celtic
Old Irish bráthair, Welsh brawd
Germanic
Gothic broþar, Old Norse bróðir, Old High Geman bruoder, Old Saxon brōthar, Old English brōðor (English brother)
Balto-Slavic
Old Church Slavonic bratrъ, Old Prussian brāti, Lithuanian brólis, Latvian brãlis
Hellenic
Ancient Greek φρᾱ́τηρ (phráter) "fraternal member"
Phrygian
Phrygian βρατερε (bratere)
Armenian
Armenian eɫbayr
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit bhrā́tar-, Avestan brātar-
Tocharian
A pracar, B procer
frente m. (Noun) "front;" "forehead"
12th cent. Old Spanish fruente. From Latin frons 'id.' The meaning of both "front" and "forehead" existed in Latin as well. Of unknown origin.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian frente, Portuguese frente, Galician fronte, Catalan front, French front, Italian fronte, Aromanian frãmti, Romanian frunte, Sardinian fronte
frío m. (Adjective, Noun) "cold"
10th cent. Old Spanish frido. From Latin frigidus 'id.,' from the verb frigere "to be cold." Ultimately from frigus "cold." From Proto-Italic *srīgos- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *sri̯Hǵ-os- 'id.'
Also the origin of Frías, the name of a town in Burgos and another in Teruel.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian fríu, Portuguese frio, Galician frío, Catalan fred, French froid, Italian freddo
Hellenic
Ancient Greek ῥῖγος (rhîgos) "cold," "frost"
In the 3rd or 4th cent. text Appendix Probi we find the line: frigida non fricda "[the word for 'cold' is] frigida, not fricda." The author's spelling correction proves how the word was pronounced by common speakers, and offers a rare glimpse of the evolution of Latin into Romance languages such as Spanish.