The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
filo- (1), -filo (1) (Affix) "loving"
18th cent. Borrowed from Ancient Greek φίλος (phílos) "beloved," earlier meaning "own," "accompanying." Of unknown origin.
filo- (2), -filo (2) (Affix) "leaf"
Very late 19th cent. Borrowed from Ancient Greek φύλλον (phyllon) 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *bhel-, *bhl̥h3- "leaf," "blossom."
Indo-European
Celtic
Middle Irish bláth "blossom," Middle Welsh blawt 'id.,' Old Cornish blodon 'id.,' Old Breton bloduu 'id.'
Germanic
Old Norse blað "leaf," Old High German blat 'id.,' Old Saxon blad 'id.,' Old Frisian bled 'id.,' Old English blæd (English blade)
Tocharian
A pält "leaf," B pilta 'id.'
fin m. (Noun) "end"
12th cent. From Latin finis 'id.' Possibly from Proto-Italic *fīni- 'id.' Of an unclear etymology.
Feminine la fin is a pre-20th cent. poetic form. Also the origin of Fines, a town in Granada, so-called in reference to the town being along limits of the region's confines.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian fin, Portuguese fim, Galician fin, Catalan fi, French fin, Italian fine, Sardinian fine
final m. (Adjective, Noun) "final," finale;" "ending"
15th cent. From Latin finalis 'id.,' from finis "end" (see fin).
Indo-European
Romance
Italian finale
finalmente (Adverb) "finally"
From final and -mente, an adverb-forming suffix.
firme (Adjective) "firm"
12th cent. From Vulgar Latin firmis 'id.,' from Latin firmus "strong." From Proto-Italic *fermo- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *dher-mo- "hold." From the root *dher- "to hold" and the noun-forming suffix *-mó- (see -me).
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese firme, Catalan ferm, French ferme, Italian fermo, Romanian ferm, Sardinian fírmu
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit dhárman- "support," "hold," "law"
flor f. (Noun) "flower"
10th cent. Borrowed from Old French or Old Occitan flor 'id.' From Latin florem, accusative of flos 'id.' From Proto-Italic *flōs 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *bhleh3- 'id.'
Also the origin of numerous names and surnames: Flores, de la Flor, Flora, Floren, Floria, Florida, Florido, Florentín, Florentino, Florindo, Florencia, Florensa, Florenza, Florencio, Florenciano, Florenzano, Florián, Floriano, Floresca, Florita, to name a few.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian flor, Portuguese flor, Galician chor, Catalan flor, French fleur, Italian fiore, Aromanian floari, Romanian floare, Sardinian fiòre
Italic
Vestinian flusare, month name, lit. "of Flusa" (goddess of flowers), Oscan fluusaí "to Flusa"
Celtic
Old Irish bláth "flower," Welsh blawd 'id.,' Middle Breton blezu 'id.,' Old Cornish blodon 'id.'
Germanic
Gothic bloma "flower," Old Norse blómi 'id.,' Old Saxon blōmo 'id.' Old English blōwan "to bloom"
Basque
Basque lore "flower," Southern Old Low Navarrese flore 'id.,' both loanwords
The word is assumed to be a loan from a Gallo Romance language on the basis that Latin florem should have yielded **llor. (Compare Basque lore "flower.") It is interesting that so elementary a lexical item was borrowed, but because other gardening words in Spanish were borrowed (e.g., jardín laurel, clavel), perhaps flor was as well.
foco m. (Noun) "focus;" "source;" "light bulb"
Early 18th cent. From Latin focus "hearth" (see fuego).
fondo m. (Noun) "bottom;" "rear"
A learned form from Latin fundus "bottom" (compare hondo). From Proto-Italic *fundo- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *bhudh-men- 'id.'
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian fondu, Portuguese fondu, Catalan fons, French fond, Italian fondo, Aromanian fundu, Romanian fund, Sardinian fundhu
Celtic
Middle Irish bond "sole"
Germanic
Old Norse botn "bottom," Old High German bodam 'id.,' Old English botem (English bottom)
Hellenic
Ancient Greek πυθμήν (puthmén) "depth"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit budhná- "bottom," Avestan būna- 'id.'
-fonía (Suffix) "sound"
Borrowed from Ancient Greek -φωνία (-phonía) 'id.,' a suffix from the word φωνή ‎(phoné) 'id.' See also -fono.