The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
Februa f. (Noun) "Februa"
Name of an old purification ritual of the Romans held in honor of Juno, Lupercus, and the month of February. Based on an unattested adjectival *februus "cleansing," "purifying;" from earlier *febro- "purification." There are two possible Proto-Indo-European sources for *febro-. From either Proto-Italic *fwesro- "burnt offering," and thus from Proto-Indo-European *dhu̯es-ro- "smoking;" or from Proto-Italic *feχwro- "burnt offering," and thus from Proto-Indo-European *dhegwh-ro- "burning." Either reconstructed source is meet.
feliz (Adjective) "happy"
13th cent. From Latin felicem, accusative of felix "happy," but earlier "fruitful." From Proto-Italic *fēlwī-, which de Vaan (2014) evincingly interprets as "with young." From Proto-Indo-European *dheh1-lu̯-i- 'id.,' a hypercorrection of earlier *dheh1-lu̯- 'id.' From the noun *dheh1-l- "young animal." From the root *dheh1- "to suckle."
As there were myriad Catholic saints named Felix, myriad names and surnames appeared throughout Spain in Christian reverence: Feliz, Félez, Felices, Felies, Felis, San Félix, Félix, San Félix, Santelices, Sanfelis, and Sanfiz.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian feliz, Portuguese feliz, Galician feliz, Catalan feliç, Italian felice, Romanian ferice
Celtic
Middle Irish deil "sow"
Germanic
Old High German tila "nipple," Old English delu 'id.'
Balto-Slavic
Lithuanian dėlė̃ "leech," Latvian dēle 'id.'
Hellenic
Ancient Greek θῆλυς (thêlus) "female"
Armenian
Armenian dayl "beestings"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit dhārú- "suckling"
feo (Adjective) ugly
12th cent. From Latin foedus "loathsome," "vile." From Proto-Italic *foiþo- "afraid." From Proto-Indo-European *bhe-bhoi̯H- "to be afraid." A reduplication of the root *bhiH- 'id.'
Also the origin of the surnames Feo and Feio.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian feu, Portuguese feio, Galician feo
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit bibháya "is afraid"
-fero, -fer- Suffix "bring"
From Latin ferre "to bring." From Proto-Italic *fer-e/o- "to carry." From Proto-Indo-European *bher-e/o- 'id.'
ferro- Prefix "iron"
Very late 16th cent. From Latin ferrum 'id.' Of unknown origin. Possibly from Phoenician barzel "iron."
"The vocabulary associated with metallurgy is very restricted and at best we can attest the existence of copper/bronze, gold, and silver; words associated with later technologies such as 'iron' escape reconstruction to any great antiquity." ~ Mallory & Adams, The Oxford Introduction to Proto-Indo-European and the Proto-Indo-European World (2006)
ferrocarril m. (Noun) "railway"
19th cent. From ferro- "iron" and carril. A calque of English "iron railway," a name used by William Jessop for his horse-drawn plateway in England.
fértil (Adjective) "fertile"
15th cent. From Latin fertilis 'id.,' from ferre "to produce," "to carry." From Proto-Italic *fer-e/o- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *bher-e/o- 'id.' A thematic present from the root *bher- "to bear."
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian fértil, Portuguese fértil, Galician fértil, Catalan fèrtil, French fertile, Italian fertile
Italic
Oscan ferríns "were to carry," Umbrian fertu "he carried," Marrucinian ferret "he carries," Volscan ferom "to carry"
Celtic
Old Irish beirid "to carry," Middle Welsh beryt "to flow," Middle Breton beraff 'id.,' Cornish kemmeres "to recieve"
Germanic
Gothic bairan "to bear," Old Norse bera 'id.,' Old Saxon beran 'id.,' Old High German beran 'id.,' Old English beran 'id.' (English to bear)
Albanian
Albanian bie "to carry"
Balto-Slavic
Old Church Slavonic bьrati "to gather," Russian brat' "to take," Lithuanian ber̃ti "to scatter"
Hellenic
Ancient Greek φέρειν (phérein) "to bear"
Phrygian
Phrygian αβ-βερετ (ab-beret) "to bear"
Armenian
Armenian berem "to bear"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit bhára- "to bear," Avestan bara- 'id.'
Tocharian
A paräṃ "to bear," B pärtä 'id.'
fiar (Verb) "to guarantee"
12th cent. From Vulgar Latin *fidare "to trust," from Latin fidere 'id.' From Proto-Italic *feiþe- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *bhei̯dh-e/o- 'id.'
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese fender, Catalan fendre, French fendre, Italian fendere
Italic
Umbrian fise (deity) "Trust"
Albanian
Albanian "oath"
Balto-Slavic
Old Church Slavonic běda "distress," Russian bedá "trouble," Czech bída "poverty," Bulgarian bedá "misery"
Hellenic
Ancient Greek πείθομαι (peíthomai) "to be convinced"
-fico, -ficio, -ficium (Suffix) "maker"
From Latin -ficus and -ficium respectively. Derived from facere "to make" (see hacer).
fiesta f. (Noun) "party," "feast"
13th cent. From Latin festa 'id.' Originally the Latin word of choice was in the masculine, festus. The modern feminine fiesta derives from a longer Roman phrase festa dies "festival days," reinterpreted as a feminine singular noun. From Proto-Italic *fēs-to "holiday." From Proto-Indo-European *dheh1-s-to- "holy." From *dheh1-s- "religious gift." Perhaps from a root *dheh1- "to gift (in a religious context)."
As a surname Fiestas, it was created in reference to Catholic holy days.
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese festo, Italian festa
Italic
Oscan fiísíais "at/by the holidays"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit dhiṣā "impetuously," Avestan dāh- "gift"