The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
familiar m. (Adjective, Noun) "familiar," "family;" "relative"
15th cent. From Latin familiaris "familiar," but also "pertaining to the household." From familia "household" (see familia) and -aris, an adjective-forming suffix (see -ar (1)).
Indo-European
Romance
Portugese familiar, Catalan familiar, French familier, Italian familiare
fámulo (Noun) "servant"
18th cent. From Latin famulus 'id.' From Proto-Italic *famelos "slave." From Proto-Indo-European *dhh1-m-elo- "foundation." From *dheh1- "to place." See also familia, hacer.
Indo-European
Romance
Portugese fâmulo, Italian famulo
Hellenic
Ancient Greek θεμέλια (themélia) "foundation," θέμις (thmis) "justice"
fantasma m. (Noun) "ghost"
13th cent. Borrowed from Latin phantasma 'id.,' itself borrowed from Ancient Greek φάντασμα ‎(phántasma) 'id.,' from the verb φαίνειν (phaínein) "to make visible." From Proto-Indo-European *bh-n-eh2- 'id.' From *bheh2- "to shine."
Indo-European
Celtic
Old Irish bán "white"
Germanic
Norwegian bina "to stare," Middle High German büenen "to polish," Old English bōnian "to ornament"
Albanian
Gheg bâj "to make, Tosk bënj 'id.'
Armenian
Armenian banam "to reveal"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit bhā́ti "to shine," Avestan bānu- "splendor"
Tocharian
A pañi "splendor," B peñiyo 'id.
fantástico (Adjective) "fantastic"
15th cent. Originally meaning "imaginary." Borrowed from Latin phantasticus "imaginary," itself borrowed from Ancient Greek φανταστικός ‎(phantastikós) "imaginary," but more literally "ghost-like." See fantasma for a continued etymology.
Indo-European
Romance
Catalan fantàstic, Italian fantastico
fascista (Noun) fascist
C. 1922. From Italian fascista id.' From Latin fascis "bundle." In the singular, the word fascis could serve as a symbol of power. In the plural form, fasces, was the name of a bound bundle of sticks, penetrated by a one-headed axe in the center, the symbol of the Roman courts and adopted by fascists of Mussolini's Italy. From Proto-Italic *faski- "bundle." Likely a loan from a non-Indo-European language located in Europe. On the basis of a clear cognate in Proto-Celtic, the word entered as a loan at some time after Proto-Indo-European had split into different languages but before the languages had evolved into Proto-Italic and Proto-Celtic. The indigenous source word had the shape *bhaskio- (de Vaan 2015). A connection to Ancient Greek φάκελ(λ)ος (phákel(l)os) "bundle" is strong, as the word is probably from Pre-Greek.
Indo-European
Celtic
Old Irish basc "necklace," Welsh beich "burden," Breton bec'h "load"
favor m. (Noun) "favor"
15th cent. From Latin favor 'id.,' from favere "to favor," "to support." From favere "to favor." From Proto-Italic *faw-ē- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *bhh2u̯-eh1- "to be favorable to." From the root *bhh2u̯- "to become" (see fu-).
Indo-European
Romance
Portugese favor, French faveur, Italian favore, Romanian favoare
Celtic
Old Irish báe "profit"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit bhūṣ- "to exert"
favorecer (Verb) "to favor"
15th cent. From Vulgar Latin *favorescere 'id.' From Latin favor "favor" (see favor) with inchoative verb-forming suffix -escere (see -ecer).
faz f. (Noun) "face"
10th cent. According to Corominas (1991), the spelling of faz was archaic even in the 10th century. Faz was pronounced /(h)adz/. The modernist variant faz /fadz/ was introduced from Latin facies "face," "shape" in the 15th century. Of unknown origin.
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese face, Galician face, Catalan faç, French face, Italian faccia, Aromanian fatsã, Romanian față, Sardinian fache
fe f. (Noun) "faith"
12th cent. From Vulgar Latin *fede 'id.' From Latin fides "trust." From Proto-Italic *fiþ-ē- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *bhidh-eh1- 'id.' From the verb *bhei̯dh- "to trust."
Variants
Old Spanish a la he "by the faith"
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian fe, Portuguese , Galician fe, Catalan fe, French foi, Italian fede, Sardinian fide
Italic
Umbrian fise (deity) "Trust"
Albanian
Albanian "oath"
Balto-Slavic
Old Church Slavonic běda "distress," Russian bedá "trouble," Czech bída "poverty," Bulgarian bedá "misery"
Hellenic
Ancient Greek πείθομαι (peíthomai) "to be convinced"
Basque
Basque fede "faith," borrowed from Vulgar Latin *fede
"Lat. fidēs preserves a very ancient meaning, blurred and simplified in other languages where the root *bheidh is represented, and altered even in Latin itself after a certain period; its meaning was not “trust” but “the inherent quality of a person which inspired confidence in him and is exercised in the form of a protective authority over those who entrust themselves to him.”" ~ E. Benveniste, Indo-European Language and Society (1973)
febrero m. (Noun) "February"
12th cent. Old Spanish hebrero. The f- was restored under the influence of scholastic Latin. From Vulgar Latin febrarius 'id.,' from Latin februarius 'id.' Named after the purification ritual Februa, held during that month (see Februa), and the adjective-forming suffix -arius (see -ero, today a noun-forming suffix).
Also the origin of the surnames Febrero and Hebrero, originally given to those born in that month.
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese fevereiro, Galician febreiro, Catalan febrer, French février, Italian febbraio, Aromanian flivar, Romanian făurar, Sardinian fiàrzu
In the 3rd or 4th cent. text Appendix Probi we find the line: Februarius non Febrarius "[the word for 'February' is] Februarius, not Febrarius." The author's spelling correction shows how the word was pronounced by common speakers, and offers a rare glimpse of the evolution of Latin into Romance languages such as Spanish.