The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
Europa f. (Noun) "Europe"
From Latin Europa 'id.' Borrowed from Ancient Greek Εὐρώπη ‎(eyrópe) "Europe," but also the name of a Phoenician princess kidnapped by Zeus. Of unknown origin.
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese Europa, Catalan Europa, French Europe, Italian Europa, Romanian Europa
evaluación f. (Noun) "evaluation"
From evaluar.
evaluar (Verb) "to evaluate"
Borrowed from French évaluer 'id.' From the prefix é- "away from" (Old French es-), from Latin ex- 'id.' (whence ex-), and value "value," originally the past participle of the verb valoir "to value," from Latin valere "to be strong" (whence valer).
evidencia f. (Noun) "evidence"
From Latin evidentia 'id.,' from evidens "apparent." From e- "thoroughly" (see ex-) and videre "to see" (see ver).
evitar (Verb) "to avoid"
15th cent. Borrowed from Latin evitare 'id.' From e- "thoroughly" (see ex-) and vitare "to avoid."
Indo-European
Romance
French éviter
evo m. (Noun) "eternity"
18th cent. term used in poetry and theological works. From Latin aevum "time," "eternity." Old Latin aivom. From Proto-Italic *aiwo- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *h2ei̯-u̯o- "time," from *h2ei̯-éu̯- "lifetime." From the root *h2ei̯- "to force;" always used in some sense in the matter of law, duty, and life.
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese evo, Italian evo, Romanian ev
Italic
Oscan aítateís "of the age," Paelignian aetatu "age"
Germanic
Gothic aiws "eternity," Old High German ēwa 'id.,' Old Saxon ēwa 'id.'
Albanian
Albanian as "not"
Hellenic
Ancient Greek αἰϝεί (aiweí) "forever"
Armenian
Armenian oč' "not"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit ā́yu "life," Old Avestan yauuaē-jī- "living eternally"
exactamente (Adverb) "exactly"
From exacto and -mente, an adverb-forming suffix.
exacto (Adjective) "exact"
Early 17th cent. From Latin exactus 'id.,' the past participle of exigere "to demand" (see exigir).
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese exigir, Catalan exigir, French exiger, Italian esigere
excelente (Adjective) "excellent"
15th cent. From Latin excellens 'id.,' from excellere "to exult." From ex- "out" (see ex-) and cellere "to raise oneself." From Proto-Italic *keln-e/o- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *kl̥-né- "to rise." From the root *kel- "to tower."
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese excelente, Catalan excel·lent, French excellent, Italian eccellente
Italic
South Picene eśelsit? (meaning unclear)
Balto-Slavic
Lithuanian kélti "to lift"
The Latin excellere "to exult" became a number of words in Romance languages of the meaning "to excel" (Catalan excellir, French exceller, Italian eccellere, Portuguese exceler), but is conspicuously absent in Spanish.
excepto (Adverb) "except"
13th cent. Borrowed from Latin exceptus "taken out," "except;" the passive participle of excipere "to take out." From ex- "out" (see ex-) and capiere "to take" (see caber).
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese exceto, French excepté, Italian eccetto