The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
estólido (Adjective) "stolid"
16th cent. From Latin stolidus "dull," originally the participle of a verb *stolere "to be insensible" that did not survived into the age of writing. Of unknown origin. On this basis of this word and Latin stultus "stupid," Pokorny (1957) reconstructs a root in Proto-Indo-European *stel- "inert," but his theory is not followed by modern linguists. See also estulto.
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese estólido, Middle French stolide, Italian stolido
estragón m. (Noun) tarragon
18th cent. Replaced earlier word taragona (c. 1592). The road of the word took to enter Spanish is long, borrowed from language to language. From French estragon 'id.' (Middle French targon); borrowed from Arabic ṭarḵūn 'id.,' which was borrowed from Syriac Aramaic ṭarkon 'id.' Perhaps borrowed borrowed from Ancient Greek δράκων (drákon) "dragon," "greater weever" which in derivations was used for plants and animals. From Proto-Indo-European *dr̥ḱ- "to look at," so-called for a dragon's terrifying, paralyzing gaze.
Indo-European
Celtic
Old Irish adcondairc "seen"
Germanic
Gothic gatarhjan "to make distinct," Old English torht "bright," Old Saxon torht 'id.,' Old High German zoraht 'id.'
Albanian
Albanian dritë "light"
Armenian
Armenian tesanem "to see"
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit darśáyati "causes to be seen," Avestan darštis "sight"
estrella f. (Noun) "star"
12th cent. From a late Vulgar Latin *strella 'id.,' from Latin stella 'id.' The appurtenance of -r- is unknown. From Proto-Italic *stērlā- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *h2stēr- 'id.'
Also the origin of the surnames Estrella, Estrello, Estrellita, and Estrellado. Given to children said to be as "hermosa como una estrella" (Tibón 1988).
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian estrella, Portuguese estrela, Galician estrela, Catalan estel, French étoile, Italian stella, Aromanian steauã, Romanian stea, Sardinian istella
Celtic
Gaulish Đirona, the name of a goddess, Old Irish ser, Old Welsh seren, Middle Breton sterenn, Old Cornish steren
Germanic
Gothic stairno, Old Norse stjarna "midday," Old Saxon sterro, Old High German sterro, Old English steorro (English star)
Hellenic
Ancient Greek ἀστήρ (astér)
Armenian
Armenian astɫ
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit stár-, Old Avestan star-
Tocharian
A śre, B ścirye
The word resembles Akkadian istar "star," which is native to Semitic (Proto-Semitic *attar), leading one to wonder if istar is the source of *h2stēr-. The problem is that Proto-Indo-European is presumed to be much older (3500 BCE at the youngest) than Akkadian (2000 BCE), so the dates are mis-matched; and *h2stēr- could not possibly come from *attar.
estudiar (Verb) "to study"
13th cent. From Medieval Latin *studiare 'id.,' from earlier Latin studere 'id.' From Proto-Italic *stud-ē- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *stu̯d-eh1- "to hit." For a semantic development, compare English to hit the books.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian estudiar, Portuguese estudar, Galician estudar, Catalan estudiar, French étudier, Italian studiare, Romanian studia
estudio m. (Noun) "study"
13th cent. From Medieval Latin studium 'id.,' from Latin studere "to study" (see estudiar).
estulto (Adjective) "stupid"
17th cent. From Latin stultus 'id.' From Proto-Italic *stl-to- 'id.' Of unknown origin. On this basis of this word and Latin stolidus "dull," Pokorny (1957) reconstructs a root in Proto-Indo-European *stel- "inert," but his theory is not followed by modern linguists. See also estólido.
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese stulto, Italian stolto
estupendo (Adjective) "stupendous"
16th cent. From Latin stupendus "stunning," gerund of stupere "to stun." See estúpido for continuing etymology.
estúpido (Adjective) "stupid"
Late 17th cent. From Latin stupidus 'id.,' formed from stupere "to stun" and -idus, an adjective-forming suffix indicating tendency (see -ido). From Proto-Italic *stup-ē- "to be stunned," from Proto-Indo-European *stu̯p-eh1- "to hit," from the verbal root *(s)teu̯p- "to beat."
Indo-European
Albanian
Albanian shtyp "to crush"
Hellenic
Ancient Greek τύπτειν (typtein) "to beat," στύπος (stypos) "stick"
Europa f. (Noun) "Europe"
From Latin Europa 'id.' Borrowed from Ancient Greek Εὐρώπη ‎(eyrópe) "Europe," but also the name of a Phoenician princess kidnapped by Zeus. Of unknown origin.
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese Europa, Catalan Europa, French Europe, Italian Europa, Romanian Europa
evaluación f. (Noun) "evaluation"
From evaluar.