The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
distar (Verb) "to distance"
15th cent. From Latin distare 'id.,' a compound of dis- "away" (see des-) and stare "to stand" (see estar).
divertir (Verb) "to amuse"
16th cent. From Latin divertere "to divert," from dis- "away" and vertere "to turn" (see des- and verter respectively).
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese divertir, Catalan divertir, French divertir, Italian divertire
In the Vulgar Latin dialect of Western Romance, the verb must have meant "to amuse," mixing the meaning of diversion with amusement.
doble m. (Adjective, Noun) "double"
12th cent. From Latin duplus 'id.' From Proto-Italic *dwiplo- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *dui- "two" (see dos) and *-pl̥h1-o- "full."
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian doble, Portuguese dobre, Galician dobre, Catalan doble, French double, Italian doppio, duplo, Romanian dublu, Sardinian dopiu
Italic
Umbrian duple
Celtic
Old Irish díabul
Germanic
Gothic tweifls "doubt," Old High German zwīval
Hellenic
Ancient Greek διπλόος (diplóos)
doctor (Noun) "doctor"
13th cent. From Latin doctor "teacher," from docere "to teach" and agent suffix -tor (see -tor). Latin docere is from Proto-Italic *dok-eje- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *doḱ-ei̯e/o, as de Vaan (2014) interprets: "to have someone accept something." From *deḱ- "to recieve."
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese doutor, Galician doutor, Catalan doctor, French docteur, Italian dottore, Romanian doctor, Sardinian duttore
Hellenic
Ancient Greek δοκεῖ (dokeî) "it seems"
dogo (1) (Noun) bulldog
17th cent. Borrowed from English dog. Perhaps from Old English *docga 'id.' (see Gąsiorowski 2006) but ultimately of unknown origin.
dogo (2) (Noun) "doge"
Borrowed from Italian doge 'id.,' from Latin dux "general." From Proto-Italic *duk- "lead," a stem used in noun-forming compounds. From Proto-Indo-European *duk- 'id.,' from the verb *deu̯k-e/o- "to pull." See also dux and inducir
Indo-European
dólar m. (Noun) "dollar"
C. 1899. From English dollar, from German Taler, short for Joachimstaler, a 16th cent. coin minted at Joachimstal, Bohemia (literally "Joachim's valley"). The name Joachim comes from the Hebrew name Jehoiachin, the apocryphal father of Mary, mother of Jesus (Jehoiachin also gives us the Spanish name Joaquín). The second element Tal "valley" is cognate to English dale. German Tal is from Proto-Germanic *dala- "valley." From Proto-Indo-European *dholh2-o- 'id.' From the root *dhelh2- "to form a cavity."
doler (Verb) "to hurt;" "to grieve"
12th cent. From Latin dolere "to be in pain." From Proto-Italic *dolē- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *dolh1-ei̯e- "to divide up by cutting." From *delh1- "to cut." The transition from division to hurt was under the ridiculous belief that being cut causes pain.
Indo-European
Romance
French doler, Romanian dura
Celtic
Middle Welsh e-thyl "chooses"
dolor m. (Noun) "pain"
12th cent. From Latin dolor 'id.,' from dolere "to be in pain" (see doler).
Also the origin of the name Dolores, a Catholic name referring to the seven pains of Mary, mother of Jesus.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian dolor, Portuguese dor, Galician dor, Catalan dol, French douleur, Italian dolore, Romanian duroare, Sardinian dolore
domingo m. (Noun) "Sunday"
13th cent. Old Spanish dominigo. From Late Latin dominicus 'id.,' from Latin dies Dominica "day of the Lord." For the etymology of dies "day," see día. Dominica is from dominus "lord" (see dueño).
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian domingu, Portuguese domingo, Galician domingo, Catalan diumenge, dia de diumenge, French dimanche, Italian domenica, Aromanian duminicã, Romanian duminică, Sardinian domigu, domiga
Italian, Aromanian, and Romanian cognates and Sardinian domiga come from Late Latin dominica.