The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
curadillo m. (Noun) "cured codfish"
A diminutive of curado (2).
curado (1) (Adjective, Noun) "cured," "curing;" "caretaker"
From curar.
curado (2) (Adjective) "cured (meat)"
From curar in the sense of "treating" meat through smoke, salts, or weathering. The process of curing meat has existed in Iberia since prehistoric times.
curadoría f. (Noun) (obsolete) "guardianship"
From curado (1).
curaduría f. (Noun) "guardianship"
Very late 15th cent. From curado (1).
curar (Verb) "to cure," "to treat," "to care for"
12th cent. Old Spanish curiar. From Latin curare 'id.' (Old Latin courare; Archaic Latin coira-). From the noun cura "care" (see cura (2)).
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese curar, Galician curar, Catalan curar, French curer, Italian curare, Aromanian cur, Romanian cura, Sardinian curài, curare
curso m. (Noun) "course"
13th cent. Old Spanish corso, curso. A learned borrowing from Latin cursus "way," "course." The native word in Spanish is coso (1).
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese corso, cosso, French cours, Italian corso, Romanian curs
Celtic
Gaulish Καρρόδουνον (karródounon) "wagontown," Old Irish carr, Middle Welsh carr, Old Breton carr, Cornish car
Germanic
Faroese hurra "to take off," Norwegian hurre "to turn," Middle High German hurren "to dash," English to hurry
curvo (Adjective) "curved"
From Latin curvus 'id.' From Proto-Italic *kurwo- 'id.' From a pre-form *kur-u̯o- 'id.' that may represent a derivation from a root *keu̯-r- "curve" (?), but that is highly speculative. The word may be have been a European innovation.
Also the origin of the surname Corvo and its derivative surnames Corvillo, Corvilla, Corvillón, and Corvaja.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian (dialects) curvu, Portuguese curvo, Galician curvo, Italian curvo
Celtic
Old Irish corr "hooked," Middle Welsh cwrr 'id.'
Hellenic
Ancient Greek κυρτός (kurtós) "convex"
cutir (Verb) "to strike"
From Latin quatere 'id.' From Proto-Italic *kwat-i- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *(s)ku̯ot-i̯- 'id.'
Indo-European
Germanic
Old Saxon skuddian "to shake," Old High German scutten 'id.,' English to shudder
Balto-Slavic
Lithuanian kùsti "to recover"
cuyo (Personal Pronoun) "whose"
13th cent. From Latin cuius "of whom" (Archaic Latin quoius), genitive of qui "who" (see (see quién and (see qué). From Proto-Italic *kwojjei 'id.' From a pre-form *kwosi̯os, a pre-Italic reformation of the old Proto-Indo-European genitive *kwoso 'id.'
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese cujo, Italian cui
Italic
Oscan púiiu, Paleo-Umbrian poíeí? (meaning unclear)
Hellenic
Ancient Greek ποῖος (poîos) "what kind"