The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
bote (4) (Adjective) "completely full"
16th cent. Borrowed from French boute 'id.' Occurs in the phrase de bote en bote, a translation of the Old French idiom de bout en bout "from one end to the other." From Old French boter "to strike" (see botar for a continued etymology).
botella f. (Noun) "bottle"
18th cent. Borrowed from French bouteille 'id.' From Latin butticula "little wineskin." From buttis "wineskin" (see bote (3)).
boxear (Verb) (sport) "to box"
20th cent. Borrowed from English box. Of unknown origin. Perhaps imitative of the sound of a blow, but note that possible cognates exist in several other Germanic languages.
Indo-European
Germanic
Middle Dutch boke "blow," Middle High German bochen "to slap," buc "blow," "stroke," Danish bask "hit"
[O]f unknown origin ; perh. related to an OTeut. *boki- ... but in this case the formation remains unexplained. It has also been compared to Danish bask blow, stripe, but no intermed. links have been found. (More probably it is of native English origin ...). ~ Sir J. A. H. Murray, A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles (1887)
boxeo m. (Noun) (sport) "boxing"
20th cent. From boxear.
brazo m. (Noun) "arm"
11th cent. From Latin bracchium 'id.' Borrowed from Ancient Greek βραχίων ‎(brakhíon) 'id.' Of unknown origin.
Also responsible for the surnames Brazo and Brazos, given to men in respect of their physical strength.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian brazu, Portuguese braço, Galician brazo, Catalan braç, French bras, Italian braccio, Dalmatian braz, Aromanian brats, Romanian braț, Sardinian baltzu
brazo m. (Noun) arm
11th cent. From Latin bracchium 'id.' Borrowed from Ancient Greek βραχίων (brakhíon) 'id.' From βρᾰχῠ́ς (brakhús) "short," crafted in reference to the shortness of the upper arm relative to the forearm. From Proto-Indo-European *mreǵh- "short," "brief."
As a surname Brazo and Brazos, first found during the Middle Ages, given to those of strength or valor.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian brazu, Portuguese braço, Galician brazo, Catalan braç, French bras, Italian braccio, Dalmatian braz, Aromanian brats, Romanian braț, Sardinian baltzu
Italic
Latin brevis "short," "brief" (see breve).
breve (Adjective) brief, "short"
13th cent. From Latin brevis 'id.' From Proto-Italic *mreχ-u-i- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *mr̥ǵh-u̯- 'id.'
Indo-European
Romance
Portuguese breve, Galician breve, Catalan breu, French bref, Italian breve
Germanic
Gothic maurgus "short," Old High German murgi 'id.,' Middle Dutch mergelijc, Old English myrige "pleasing," "brisk" (English merry)
Hellenic
Ancient Greek βρᾰχῠ́ς (brakhús) "short" (see brazo)
Indo-Iranian
Sanskrit múhu "suddenly," Avestan mərəzu 'id.'
brezo (1) m. (Noun) "heather"
13th cent. Old Spanish bruezo. From Vulgar Latin *broccius 'id.,' from Proto-Celtic *wroiko- 'id.' Of unknown origin but probably borrowed from the same source language as the Balto-Slavic "heather"-words (infra).
Variants
Navarre beruezo, La Rioja brozo
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian berezu, gorbizu (< *go-brizu), (Palacios del Sil) bouza "thicket," Galician breixo, Old French bruiere
Celtic
Welsh grug "heather," Old Irish freoch "heather," Gaelic fraoch 'id.'
Balto-Slavic
Russian véres "heather," Slovene vrẹ̑s "heather," Polish vřes "heather," Lithuanian vìržis "heather," Latvian vir̂zis 'id.'
brezo (2) m. (Noun) "rocking cradle"
16h cent. On the basis of its phonology, hypothesized to be from a Celtic language (several Celtic tongues were spoken in Iberia in ancient times). From Proto-Celtic **brett- or *bert- "bed," "cradle." Of unknown origin.
brillante (Adjective) "brilliant"
17th cent. From brillar.
Indo-European
Romance
Asturian (Palluezu) brillante, Portuguese brilhante, Galician brillante, Catalan brillant, French brillant, Italian brillante